Date
18 January 2017
Dealing with increasingly creative staff theft and cheating has become a challenge for many firms. Photo: Internet
Dealing with increasingly creative staff theft and cheating has become a challenge for many firms. Photo: Internet

Staff cheating: It’s more common than you think

Selling company secrets and research results to rivals for personal gain is not uncommon in China.

Stealing from factories is also a significant problem, especially if precious materials (such as gold) are used in the production process.

But apparently, the problem is not unique to China.

Recently, I read a book from a certified fraud examiner in the US. In the book, the American recalled his early career as a manager for a restaurant chain.

He noted that one manager was using a store as a front for selling drugs, handing out the illegal stuff via a drive-through window.

“Customers would place their order with him and find something other than fish and chips in their bags,” he wrote.

In another case, a catering manager in a store brought his own cash register to ring up sales for himself when the cashier took her break.

Even among the employees who don’t cheat, there are many who do not work wholeheartedly for their bosses.

A blogger recently discussed the issue and came to this conclusion—unless employees feel they are working for themselves, they won’t be fully motivated.

To solve the problem, companies are advised to align their interests with those of the staff through a clear profit-sharing scheme.

Such initiative will prompt the employees to start thinking and acting like an owner, leading to better work performance.

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RC

EJ Insight writer

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