25 October 2016
Individuals who have untreated ADHD might have a hard time working with colleagues. Photo: Xinhua
Individuals who have untreated ADHD might have a hard time working with colleagues. Photo: Xinhua

Hotheaded and often depressed? You may be suffering from ADHD

Derek, 38, is a bank manager.

For years, he has constantly received complaints from his bank’s clients about his carelessness.

He has also missed several opportunities to get promoted because, being hotheaded, he has often clashed with his supervisor.

Back home, the situation is not so good, either. His marriage ended in a divorce because his wife could not put up with his temper any more.

Considering himself a loser at work and at home, Derek has been drinking heavily to relieve his stress. 

Taking pity on him, his ex-wife prodded him to seek professional help.

He was diagnosed as suffering from depression, and his ailment was traced to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

People with ADHD show inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

They are easily distracted, disorganized, impatient, bad-tempered, lacking the ability to work efficiently or to follow instructions.

These symptoms give the impression that they are irresponsible and careless.

They are not popular in the workplace because colleagues often find themselves making up for their mistakes and irresponsibility.

As a result, individuals with ADHD often suffer from other ailments, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and resort to substance abuse such as indulging in drugs and alcohol.

Social anxiety disorder is particularly common among ADHD patients.

Fortunately, ADHD patients usually respond well to medication. As soon as the ADHD symptoms are put under control, their stress and emotional problems are also reduced.

Currently, patients are advised to take central nervous system (CNS) stimulants, which can help them concentrate better and be less impulsive.

Since it takes time to form new work habits, patients are advised not to stop or skip the medications too early.

The latest drugs can last for 12 hours which can greatly avoid the problem of forgetting pill intakes.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on June 24.

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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