Date
24 May 2017
An escalator and food court at Hysan Place in Causeway Bay. The facility is among those added to an annual list of locations vulnerable to upskirt voyeurism. Photo: YouTube
An escalator and food court at Hysan Place in Causeway Bay. The facility is among those added to an annual list of locations vulnerable to upskirt voyeurism. Photo: YouTube

DAB identifies 17 new ‘upskirt blackspots’

The food court at Hysan Place in Causeway Bay, The ONE shopping mall in Tsim Sha Tsui and some areas at MTR’s Central and Hong Kong stations are among the newly identified “upskirt blackspots” in the city.

In an annual report on locations deemed unsafe for skirt-wearers, the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB) has added 17 locations across the city where women could fall prey to voyeurs.

Four of the newly added spots are in Causeway Bay. They are the food court and Eslite Book Store at Hysan Place, and some areas near the glass railings at Windsor House and Causeway Place.

Glass railings at the Central, Hong Kong and Tiu Keng Leng MTR stations, as well as those at Cheung Fat Plaza in Tsing Yi, The ONE mall in Tsim Sha Tsui, and MOKO above the Mong Kok East MTR station were among the other locations on the expanded DAB list, Headline Daily reported.

Hong Kong’s largest political party has been publishing its so-called upskirt blackspot list for the past seven years to warn women about voyeur traps, especially during the summer months.

Women standing near glass railings are vulnerable to peeping Toms who park themselves at a lower level. There have been cases when some men surreptitiously filmed women and posted the upskirt images online.

Legislator Elizabeth Quat, who was in charge of the survey, said shopping malls and facility owners should install matt surface stickers on the glass panels in order to prevent voyeurism.

Headline Daily pointed out that upskirt photos can be found easily on online platforms, with people even leaving comments on the images.

According to a senior barrister named Albert Luk Wai-hung, people found guilty of capturing indecent images and outraging the modesty of women can face up to seven years in jail.

Luk said that any person intentionally staying at a place to take pictures could run the risk of being prosecuted under loitering laws, with the maximum penalty being two years in prison.

If the images or video clips are uploaded to the internet, a charge of accessing computer with criminal intent could be pressed and the person could face up to five years in jail upon conviction.

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