Date
25 January 2017
MTR operations manager Allen Ding said passengers who already hold a permit for oversized musical instruments need not apply for another one for sporting gear. Photo: MTR Corp.
MTR operations manager Allen Ding said passengers who already hold a permit for oversized musical instruments need not apply for another one for sporting gear. Photo: MTR Corp.

MTR to allow oversized sporting goods on trains

MTR Corp. has decided to allow certain large sporting gear on its trains during off-peak hours as part of a registration system it launched for oversized musical instruments in November last year.

From Aug. 1, a passenger with the necessary permit can bring along one piece of oversized sporting gear on the train, except for the period between 8:15 a.m. and 9:15 a.m. from Monday through Friday, which is considered as rush hour, Metro Daily reports, citing an announcement from the train operator.

That means a passenger can bring to the train an oversized musical instrument and one piece of oversized sporting gear at the same time, if they can carry both, during regulated hours as long as their sizes are within limits.

Sporting equipment cannot exceed 1.45 meters in length, width or height, or a total dimension of 2.35 meters, which is the same limit set on oversized musical instruments, the MTR said.

The company extended the scope of the registration system, which only covered musical instruments in the beginning, following public clamor for the concession to also cover bulky sport equipment.

MTR operations manager Allen Ding Ka-chun said sports gear, such as hockey clubs, golf clubs and fishing rods, are allowed on trains as long as their measurements are consistent with the rules.

He said the MTR management decided to extend the scope of the scheme following a rush of applications for permit to carry oversized musical instruments on trains over the past months, with at least 2,387 such permits having been issued.

Those who already hold a permit for oversized musical instruments need not apply for another one for sporting gear, Ding said, adding that all permits will expire on Dec. 31, 2018 regardless of when they are issued.

Response to the expansion of the registration scheme drew mixed response from sporting circles, Ming Pao Daily reports.

Danny Mak, chairman of the Hong Kong Billiard Sports Control Council, welcomed the new rules, saying they will provide great convenience for pool players.

The length of most cue sticks is within the limit set by the MTR, he added.

But Yuen Ka-ying, a member of Hong Kong martial arts team, said the revised scheme does not help much because many weapons used in the sport, including sticks and spears, are longer than 1.45 meters and therefore will still not be allowed on trains.

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TL/AC/CG

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