Date
18 October 2017
Torrential rains caused severe flooding and disrupted people's daily lives in Beijing and some other parts of northern China this week. Photo: CNSA
Torrential rains caused severe flooding and disrupted people's daily lives in Beijing and some other parts of northern China this week. Photo: CNSA

Heavy rains cause flooding in Beijing; flights, trains disrupted

Beijing has suffered severe flooding in several areas of the city following torrential rains that have also affected other parts of northern China.

The Chinese capital took a big hit from the downpour which began on Monday and continued to lash the city yesterday, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reported.

The rain, said to be the heaviest this year, disrupted people’s daily lives and caused serious losses to businesses. 

Hundreds of cars were stranded on flooded roads and several subway stations were forced to close.

The Beijing–Tianjin high-speed rail line saw services being suspended, while many flights from the city’s airport were either delayed or cancelled.

Beijing Capital International Airport cancelled at least 237 flights on Wednesday. Meanwhile, at least 188 flights were scrapped by Tianjin Binhai International Airport.

Flight cancellations and delays affected more than 100,000 travelers.

The heavy rainfall prompted Beijing’s meteorological department to upgrade the alert for torrential rain to “orange”, the second highest on its four-tier alert system.

The State Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters Office said on Wednesday that the third-degree flood control measure was launched for Hai River, the largest one in northern China.

The move came as the river was overloaded by heavy rain and caused floods in the areas it passes through.

Beijing Mayor Wang Anshun urged all authorities to do their best to make sure that no one dies in the floods, aiming to prevent a recurrence of the tragedy the city witnessed four years ago.

In July 2012, 79 people were killed by floods in Beijing as the city was struck by heavy rain.

Following this week’s downpour, some people were concerned about the priceless artifacts stored in Beijing’s Palace Museum, am730 noted.

It is a wonder that the ancient treasures have escaped damage, given the inferior drainage system in the city, netizens commented. 

Apart from Beijing, several other parts of northern China were also affected by the heavy rain.

Dozens of trains from Shanxi province to Beijing and Tianjin were canceled, the most in more than 20 years.

Data from the Ministry of Civil Affairs showed the death toll in six northern provinces stood at 13 as of 9 am Wednesday, with another 62 missing and more than 1.73 million people distressed.

The National Meteorological Center has warned that the rainstorm could continue Thursday.

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TL/AC/RC

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