Date
29 March 2017
A file photo (inset) shows a man performing a rooftop leap at a Hong Kong high-rise recently. Police have questioned three men who were purportedly planning another stunt at an East Tsim Sha Tsui building. Photos: wikipedia, Instagram/Storror
A file photo (inset) shows a man performing a rooftop leap at a Hong Kong high-rise recently. Police have questioned three men who were purportedly planning another stunt at an East Tsim Sha Tsui building. Photos: wikipedia, Instagram/Storror

Three foreigners questioned over parkour stunt plan

Police have questioned three young foreigners who trespassed into a construction site in East Tsim Sha Tsui over the weekend to prepare for a suspected parkour stunt.

The men — a 16-year-old Australian, a 19-year-old German and a 20-year-old Danish national — were grilled after they were spotted at a high-rise building site in suspicious circumstances.

According to Headline Daily, a security guard at a yet-to-be-completed 60-storey tower at 18 Salisbury Road called the police after he noticed intruders in the early hours of Sunday.

Officers arrived at the site and began questioning the three young men as to what they were doing at the under-construction building, which was part of a New World Development project.

It then transpired that the men had been scouting the area in order to plan and perform a daring parkour stunt at the high-rise tower.

A drone camera was recovered from one of the foreigners, who told the police that they were aiming to perform a dare-devil stunt from the high-rise and capture it on camera.

The men were given a verbal warning and let off by the officers.

As the youth did not actually commit any criminal act, the police treated the case as one of nuisance and decided not to punish the three.

Sunday’s incident came as the extreme sport of parkour, which involves people jumping, leaping or climbing from one point to another without safety equipment, has been catching the fancy of many teens.

Storror, a parkour team from the United Kingdom, gained a lot of attention as it came to Hong Kong and performed several stunts between two blocks of North Point Provident Centre earlier this month.

Videos of their daring leaps and stunts have gone viral.

The extreme excitement of the sport is prompting some Hong Kong youth to join in, sparking worries among local citizens.

A member of Superadd-Parkour Association, a local parkour group, told Headline Daily that the group is aware of the risks in the sport.

“Because we know how dangerous it is, we must be fully confident and do full preparation before we perform,” he said.

According to lawyer Albert Luk Wai-hung, a performer could be charged with disorderly conduct in a public place and face up to one year in jail and a HK$5,000 fine.

Meanwhile, landlords can seek compensation if people perform stunts at buildings without seeking prior permission, he said.

Translation by Chloe Chow

Nothing tops Chungking Mansions for this roof jumper (July 12, 2016)

Whoa! And this is just practice (July 6, 2016)

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