Date
26 May 2017
Director Lav Diaz holds the Golden Lion prize for the movie Ang Babaeng Humayo (The Woman Who Left) during the awards ceremony at the 73rd Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy, on Saturday. Photo: Reuters
Director Lav Diaz holds the Golden Lion prize for the movie Ang Babaeng Humayo (The Woman Who Left) during the awards ceremony at the 73rd Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy, on Saturday. Photo: Reuters

Philippine revenge drama wins Venice Film Fest top prize

A nearly four-hour long movie about a woman’s thirst for revenge and her feelings of forgiveness after 30 years in jail for a crime she did not commit has won the Venice Film Festival’s top prize, Reuters reports.

Director Lav Diaz has described Ang Babaeng Humayo (The Woman Who Left) as a testimony to the struggles of the Philippines after centuries of colonial rule. 

“This is for my country, for the Filipino people, for our struggle, for the struggle of humanity,” the 57-year-old said as he accepted the Golden Lion award for his black-and-white movie.

Diaz, who at the Berlin Film Festival in February had premiered a film that ran over eight hours, said he hoped the latest recognition would create more appreciation for longer movies.

“Cinema is still very young, you can still push it,” he said.

Twenty US and international movies featuring top Hollywood talent and auteur directors were in competition at the world’s oldest film festival, in its 73rd outing this year.

The event is seen as a launching pad for the industry’s award season.

All the movies that won awards were examples of directors’ “lack of compromise, [their] imagination, original vision, daring, and a kind of pure identity”, said Sam Mendes, known for directing James Bond movies Skyfall and Spectre, who headed the jury.

“It’s taken me out of my comfort zone.”

Mendes said he hoped the awards would help the films get distributed.

The runner-up Grand Jury prize went to Tom Ford’s thriller Nocturnal Animals, the second feature by the celebrated fashion designer.

The Best Director award was shared by Russia’s Andrei Konchalovsky for the Holocaust drama Rai (Paradise) and Mexico’s Amat Escalante for La Region Salvaje (The Untamed).

American Emma Stone took the Best Actress prize for her role in the musical La La Land and Argentine actor Oscar Martinez was named Best Actor for his performance in the comedy-drama El Ciudadano Ilustre (The Distinguished Citizen).

German actress Paula Beer received the Marcello Mastroianni Award acknowledging an emerging performer, for her role in post-war drama Frantz.

Noah Oppenheim took the best screenplay award for his work on Pablo Larrain’s Jackie, about first lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the aftermath of the assassination of her husband US President John F. Kennedy.

The special jury prize went to Ana Lily Amirpour’s cannibal-survivor fairytale The Bad Batch. While the film earned mixed reviews, the jury appreciated its spirit.

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Lav Diaz with actors of the movie Ang Babaeng Humayo, Charo Santos-Concio (center) and John Lloyd Cruz. Photo: Reuters


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