Date
11 December 2016
The Department of Justice under Rimsky Yuen is studying whether to press charges in an assault complaint against Franklin Chu (inset). Photos: HKEJ
The Department of Justice under Rimsky Yuen is studying whether to press charges in an assault complaint against Franklin Chu (inset). Photos: HKEJ

Alleged police assault victim still waiting for justice

A man allegedly beaten by a senior police officer during the democracy protests is still waiting for justice two years after the incident.

Osman Cheng said he feels helpless that his case has hardly moved after 700 days and seems to drag on forever, Apple Daily reports. 

Cheng filed a complaint with the police department against former Sha Tin division commander Franklin Chu regarding an alleged assault in November 2014.

Cheng’s lament comes as seven officers are facing trial over the alleged beating of democracy activist Ken Tsang during the same protests.   

Vowing to keep fighting, Cheng said his life will return to normal only when justice is served.

The alleged assault took place on Nov. 26, 2014 in Mong Kok, where Chu, who retired in July 2015, was accused of striking several people, including Cheng, with a baton.

The Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC), by a 12-6 vote, filed a formal complaint against Chu one day before his retirement.

However, the Complaints Against Police Office did not accept the council’s conclusion until December 2015 when it determined that there was assault.

A criminal probe into Chu began in February and finished in June this year.

A Department of Justice spokesman said the DOJ has been examining evidence and checking related laws before it decides whether to prosecute Chu.

Cheng accused government departments of covering up for each other, with the aim of “settling the case by leaving it unsettled”, he said.

He said he has no personal grudge against Chu, adding his complaint is about abuse of police power.

Eric Cheung, an assistant professor in the law faculty of the University of Hong Kong and a former IPCC member, told Apple Daily that he could not understand why the case has taken so long.

He said the facts of the case are not complicated and the DOJ could have pushed for it as long as it wanted.

District councilor Au Nok-hin, convenor of the Civil Human Rights Front, said procrastination in the case is “intentional”.

He criticized the DOJ for double standard, saying it has one track for democracy-related complaints and another for all others.

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TL/AC/RA

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