Date
8 December 2016
Different brands of skin moisturizers vary in prices, but the highest-priced products do not necessarily yield the best results. Photo: Consumer Council
Different brands of skin moisturizers vary in prices, but the highest-priced products do not necessarily yield the best results. Photo: Consumer Council

When choosing skin moisturizers, don’t equate price with quality

Many brands and types of skin moisturizers are available in the local market, but although their prices vary significantly, those with higher prices do not necessarily yield better results, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports, citing the results of tests conducted by the Consumer Council.

The tests covered 17 types of skin moisturizers whose prices vary from about HK$100 to HK$2,000 per container.

A comparison of the highest-priced and cheapest products showed that although their prices per 10 milliliters have a difference of 20 times, the moisturising efficacy of both is only average, the tests showed.

The tests were jointly conducted by the council and the International Consumer Research and Testing.

A total of 530 women living in Germany, aged from 25 to 66, sampled the products’ moisturizing effects over a period of four weeks.

During the tests, a sample moisturizer is applied on a volunteer’s volar arm and a standard moisturizer on the other, after which the level of “electric capacitance” or ability to store an electrical charge, on the outermost layer of the skin is measured before and after use of both moisturizers to evaluate their skin moisturizing efficacy.

The results showed that La Mer’s moisturizing gel cream, which sells at the highest price of HK$2,700 per container or HK$450 per 10ml, registered 2.5 points in moisturizing efficacy, which means its ability to moisturize the skin is limited even after four weeks of regular use, Apple Daily reported.

Among the samples, Laneige, a South Korean brand, has the lowest moisturizing efficacy, attaining only 1.5 points on a scale of five.

Laneige had reacted to the Consumer Council test results, noting that the volunteers’ skin types are different from those of their target customers.

It also said that the tested model has a luminous block function and an enhanced version replaced the product in May this year.

Olay and two other brands of moisturizers from France registered the best scores in moisturizing efficacy.

The council reminds consumers to be aware of a product’s moisturizing efficacy as well as its ingredient information.

Users should see whether a product contains substances that may trigger skin allergies or irritation, preservatives, alcohol and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

Gilly Wong Fung-han, chief executive of the Consumer Council, points out that there is no law in Hong Kong requiring beauty products to list their ingredients, unlike in other jurisdictions like Europe and Australia.

Such a situation is unfavorable for consumers, and Wong is urging the government to amend the law.

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EL/AC/CG

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