Date
4 December 2016
Yau Wai-ching (circle) apologised on social media (inset) for a draft letter she planned to send to Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen (above). Photos: Reuters, Facebook/Yau Wai-ching
Yau Wai-ching (circle) apologised on social media (inset) for a draft letter she planned to send to Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen (above). Photos: Reuters, Facebook/Yau Wai-ching

Yau Wai-ching wrote draft letter to Tsai about NT sovereignty

Yau Wai-ching tried to write to Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen regarding the issue of sovereignty over Hong Kong’s New Territories.

The letter was disapproved by her separatist Youngspiration party and it remained as a draft, news website hk01.com reports.

Yau and partymate Sixtus Baggio Leung have been disqualified by the High Court from the Legislative Council for improperly taking their oaths of office.

They are appealing the decision.

According to a post on Yau’s Facebook page, the letter wound up not being sent after it was vetoed by her partymates, the website reports, citing Taiwan newspaper Liberty Times.

She later apologized for causing a misunderstanding.

Yau wrote that an interpretration of Article 104 of the Basic Law by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee which also disqualified her and Leung was a breach of the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration.

She said the treaty states that Hong Kong Island and Kowloon Peninsula belonged to Britain permanently.

But both the Treaty of Nanjing and Treaty of Beijing signed in the 19th century show Britain only rented the New Territories from the Qing dynasty for 99 years, she wrote.

Therefore, the government of Taiwan, officially the Republic of China, that overthrew the Qing dynasty and ruled China before it moved to the island in 1949, should have a say in the New Territories’ sovereignty.

Yau said in the letter that the People’s Republic of China has usurped the New Territories for 19 years since Hong Kong’s return in 1997.

As such, she wanted Tsai to officially and clearly express Taiwan’s stance on the issue under the framework of the Taiwan constitution

Wong Man-kong, a Hong Kong deputy to the NPC, called Yau’s claim “condemnable”, saying her letter showed her ignorance of political reality and history.

Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam said no foreign governments or their officials should interfere in Hong Kong’s internal affairs, thestandnews.com reports.

Meanwhile, Global Times, a sister publication of the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily, quoted a Hong Kong expert in Shenzhen University as saying Yau was trying to rally support from forces in Taiwan’s independence movement to push independence for Hong Kong.

The Democratic Progressive Party chaired by Tsai has been calling for Taiwan independence.

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