Date
19 August 2017
A challenger walks on a slackline strung out from one point of Lion Rock Mountain to another. Seven people successfully crossed it. Photos: Facebook/LicoIn Tse
A challenger walks on a slackline strung out from one point of Lion Rock Mountain to another. Seven people successfully crossed it. Photos: Facebook/LicoIn Tse

Viewers hold their breath at Lion Rock slackliners

Dozens of hikers held their breath at the sight of several people trying to walk high up in the air from one point of a mountain to another in an extreme sport known as slacklining.

Slacklining is the act of walking along a suspended length of flat webbing that is tensioned between two anchors.

Visitors to Lion Rock Mountain on Saturday were swept off their feet by the spectacle which happened 500 meters above ground, Apple Daily reports.

Enthusiasts use a piece of one-inch climbing webbing, or slackline strung between two points and pulled tight for them to walk on, like tight-rope walking but with a little slack.

Seven challengers walked on the slackline which normally holds several people, and successfully reached the goal one after another.

Viewers who watched them on the spot or through online clips said they broke out in a cold sweat during the challenge.

The group wore protective gear.

Ricardo, a 29-year-old member of the group from Mexico, said he fell in love with the sport soon after he began to work in Hong Kong five years ago as a translator.

Having practised his sense of balance in many places, he said Lion Rock is perfect for slacklining in terms of location and weather.

Barrister Albert Luk said the slackliners did not violate the Country Parks Ordinance as the activity did not involve damage to trees, Headline Daily reports.

The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department also confirmed that slacklining is not currently regulated but called on people to watch out for their own safety when in a country park.

Nip Yuen-fung, chairman of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department Staffs General Association, said citizens should not engage in slacklining given its high risk.

Any protection might not be enough to keep a challenger from falling off the ropes.

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TL/AC/RA

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