Date
19 August 2017
The Pro-democracy camp is describing its success as a victory for true democracy. They won 325 seats out of a possible 356 on the 1,200-strong Election Committee. Photo: HKEJ
The Pro-democracy camp is describing its success as a victory for true democracy. They won 325 seats out of a possible 356 on the 1,200-strong Election Committee. Photo: HKEJ

Pro-democracy camp wins 325 seats on Election Committee

The pro-democracy camp has achieved its aim of getting more than 300 seats in a body that will pick Hong Kong’s next chief executive.

They got 325 seats out of a possible 356 on the 1,200-strong Election Committee, public broadcaster RTHK reports.

The camp swept their traditional stronghold subsectors such as legal, social welfare, information technology and higher education.

More surprising victories came in the health services and medical fields.

Five years ago, pro-democracy candidates got only three out of 60 seats, but this year, they swept the two subsectors.

Physiotherapist Lit Ming-wai, from the health services sector, described their triumph as a victory for true democracy.

Two organisers of the pro-democracy Occupy movement in 2014 — Benny Tai and Chan Kin-man — won seats in the higher education sector. 

The president of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Fung Wai-wah, and veteran journalist Bruce Lui, who is now a lecturer at the Baptist University, also won seats in the subsector.

The Election Committee, however, remains largely dominated by the pro-Beijing camp.

It dominated fields such as labor, commerce and other business sectors.

Before the polls, most of more than 400 seats that returned unopposed went to the pro-Beijing camp.

The pro-government Federation of Trade Unions won 41 of 60 seats in the labor sector. In the cultural sector, the pro-establishment camp kept its tight grip, defeating all 15 pro-democracy candidates.

In the performing arts sector, TVB’s Lee Po-on and actor Eric Tsang were elected as expected.

But filmmaker Derek Yee scored a surprise win in the subsector which saw winners returned unopposed five years ago.

The chief executive election will take place on March 26, 2017. A candidate needs to get more than 600 votes from the 1,200-member committee to be selected as chief executive.

The new chief executive will take office on July 1 after being approved by Beijing.

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JP/RA

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