Date
19 November 2017
If you have to drink excessive amounts of water to quench your thirst daily, you might have to consult a doctor. Photo: Reuters
If you have to drink excessive amounts of water to quench your thirst daily, you might have to consult a doctor. Photo: Reuters

Diabetes from the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine

Do you often feel thirsty, tired or hungry? Do you experience weight loss for no obvious reasons, sweating, palpitations or trembling?

You should consult a doctor. You might be suffering from diabetes.

Diabetes is one of the most common but severe endocrine disorders.

Eily suffers from diabetes. She follows the western medical approach of taking pills and insulin treatment to stabilize her condition.

She asked me if there is anything else she could do to strengthen her bodily functions and improve her conditions.

In traditional Chinese medicine, diabetes falls under the category of xiaoke (消渴), meaning excessive drinking.

Deficiencies inherited from parents, plus emotional imbalances and poor dieting, contribute to yin deficiency and dry-heat to the body.

The illness is closely related to the functions of lungs, stomach, spleen and kidneys.

Lungs. Hurt by dry-heat, the lungs fail to facilitate the movement of fluid within the body, resulting in having a dry mouth and throat, which leads to excessive drinking of water and frequent urination.

Stomach and spleen. Dry-heat stimulates the stomach, leading to an increase in appetite, while weak spleen qi may result in a situation where nourishment from digested food is not being distributed throughout the body, thus leading to a weak physique.

Kidneys. Without sufficient nourishment, the kidneys’ reabsorption function is weakened, and this leads to excessive production of urine, increased frequency of urination, and urine with traces of sugar.

In Eily’s case, I would recommend electromagnetic therapy to invigorate the flow of nutrition throughout the body via the meridians. It would also help promote her kidneys’ functions and boost her strength.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Dec. 12.

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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DY/JP/CG

Registered Chinese medicine practitioner

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