Date
23 November 2017
Thinly-sliced pear and bamboo shoots surrounded by fresh Japanese seaweed and sea grapes in ponzu sauce (left) and wild matsutake mushroom soup. Photos: HKEJ
Thinly-sliced pear and bamboo shoots surrounded by fresh Japanese seaweed and sea grapes in ponzu sauce (left) and wild matsutake mushroom soup. Photos: HKEJ

Michelin veggie restaurant pride of Shanghai

Fu He Hui is a one-star Michelin restaurant featuring inventive and modern vegetarian cuisine in Shanghai’s Changning district.

It was also voted No. 18 in Asia’s 50 Best restaurants this year.

Located in Yuyuan Road in the International Settlement, the building has a contemporary architecture and a zen-inspired lobby.

Its name, which literally means “good fortune and wisdom”, was inspired by a classic Buddhist proverb which states that the wise should remain grateful and perform good deeds.

The menu consisted of eight dishes and the appetizers were an instant delight — linseed crisps, feta cheese tart with mushy peas, mashed potato and carrot balls, and dried pickled plum vinegar and pickled cherry tomatoes.

Each bite was palatable.

The first dish was pear and bamboo shoots from which the two ingredients in season were thinly sliced, surrounded by fresh Japanese seaweed and sea grapes and topped with ponzu sauce.

Wild matsutake mushrooms fresh out of Yunnan province were made into a broth, accompanied by bean curd made from mung bean soy milk. The soup had the taste of a fresh lotus seed pod.

The sophistication of the chef was obvious from the simple yet elegant dishes.

The most creative and impressive dish was the lettuce wraps with euryale seeds, wheat grains and asparagus.

It gave away a tender, chewy texture and a slightly hot flavor.

Meicai blew my mind. The mini-buns were filled with a soft cheese mixture of dried pickled Chinese mustard, apple and celery stalks.

The ordinary soy sauce-marinated eggplants were injected with the addition of black Périgord truffle.

The veggie version of the five spiced pork cubes used penny buns instead. It went well with chestnut rice served in a bamboo bowl. It was delicious and good-looking.

The dessert, mango tapioca ice cream, looked exactly like mango but presented in an unexpected form.

Fu He Hui is run by executive chef Tony Lu, who also oversees three restaurants — Fu 1015, Fu 1039 and Fu 1088 — in the group.

Lu also serves as a consultant to Yong Yi Ting in Mandarin Oriental Pudong and Jin Sha at Four Seasons Hotel Hangzhou in West Lake.

The quality of the food delivered by a chef who is highly sought-after by world-class hotels is well assured.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Dec. 19.

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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DY/JP/RA

Fu He Hui takes great paints to present its delicious food in a certain style. Photos: HKEJ


Mango tapioca ice cream looks exactly like a mango but presented in an unexpected way. Photo: HKEJ


Hong Kong food critic

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