Date
23 October 2018
Poisoned meat samples (inset top) were taken away for tests. Slices of meat suspected of being laced with rat poison were found scattered on the road in Mid-Levels. Photo: Facebook/SPCA(HK)
Poisoned meat samples (inset top) were taken away for tests. Slices of meat suspected of being laced with rat poison were found scattered on the road in Mid-Levels. Photo: Facebook/SPCA(HK)

Bowen Road dog poisoner may have struck again

Two dogs are being treated after they ate poisoned meat scattered on the road in Mid-Levels.

The incident sparked fears the notorious Bowen Road dog poisoner may have struck again, news website hk01.com reports.

The animals — both mongrels — appear to have been poisoned separately.

One was found vomiting by its owner during a walk on Bowen Road, according to the Hong Kong Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA).

The other showed similar symptoms after returning home from a walk with its owner on Wan Chai Gap Road.  

Both owners, who are foreigners, took their pets to veterinary clinics run by SPCA, where the dogs are in stable condition.

A search of the premises over the weekend led SPCA inspectors to slices of meat covered in purple powder scattered on the road.

The case has been reported to the police. Tests will be performed on the meat. 

SPCA inspector Bob Kwong said the meat in question might have been laced with rat poison, chicken and leftover food as happened in the Bowen Road poisonings 20 years ago.

The incidents killed more than 200 dogs and the perpetrator remains at large. The SPCA has put up a HK$200,000 reward for his capture.

Recent dog poisonings in the area bore the hallmarks of the Bowen Road incidents, leading authorities to suspect these were committed by the same person.

SPCA urged dog owners to refrain from walking their dogs in places that are considered high risk such as Bowen Road, Black’s Link, Dutch Path and Wan Chai Gap Road.

It said they should keep their dogs from eating anything on the ground.

Anyone with information can call the SPCA hotline at 2711 1000.

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/AC/RA

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