Date
22 September 2017
The couple lived in King Shan Court in Diamond Hill. They had no children, were not in financial distress and had no record of domestic violence, according to the police. Photo: Wikipedia
The couple lived in King Shan Court in Diamond Hill. They had no children, were not in financial distress and had no record of domestic violence, according to the police. Photo: Wikipedia

Man suspected of jumping to death after strangling wife

A 58-year-old man plunged to his death Wednesday morning from his home in a high-rise building in Diamond Hill while his 56-year-old wife was found dead in her bed.

The man, surnamed Au, might have killed his wife before committing suicide, unable to bear their situation any longer, Apple Daily reports.

Au, a taxi driver, lived with his wife in King Shan Court. They had no children. Au’s mother lives in the same estate.

He was found unconscious on the ground at 7:35 a.m. and was rushed to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Police later found the body of his wife with signs of strangulation. A belt was found inside the bedroom.

Investigations revealed that the couple was troubled by various illnesses.

The wife suffered from dementia and Au, who had been caring for her, had a genetic skin disease, investigators said.

Au’s sister told police that he left her a WhatsApp message early Wednesday morning, saying he had nothing to live for and wanted to die because he was too tired.

The couple was not in financial distress and had no record of domestic violence.

Police classified the case as murder-suicide.

There are about 100,000 elderly people in Hong Kong suffering from dementia, according to the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

Only 12,000 received specialist treatment in 2015, Ming Pao Daily reported, citing the Hospital Authority.

Social worker Situ Han-ming said people who have to take care of patients with dementia are prone to depression.

EJ Insight supports efforts to help people deal with depression and related issues. Here is the 24-hour multilingual suicide prevention hotline of The Samaritans: +852 2896 0000 (or email [email protected]).

- Contact us at [email protected]

TL/AC/RA

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe