Date
27 July 2017
The Silent Majority, led by Robert Chow (inset), sent representatives to the CNEC Lau Wing Sang Secondary School in Chai Wan to confront teacher Edward Yau. Photos: Wikipedia, Facebook, CNSA
The Silent Majority, led by Robert Chow (inset), sent representatives to the CNEC Lau Wing Sang Secondary School in Chai Wan to confront teacher Edward Yau. Photos: Wikipedia, Facebook, CNSA

Silent Majority accused of harassing teacher over convicted cops

Legislator Ted Hui Chi-fung of the Democratic Party accused pro-Beijing group Silent Majority of harassing a high school teacher who spoke against police officers supporting their seven colleagues who had been convicted of assaulting an activist in the 2014 Occupy protests.

In an article on its website, the group said it had sent several representatives to the CNEC Lau Wing Sang Secondary School in Chai Wan to confront the teacher, Edward Yau, who is a famous blogger using the pen name Kursk, Apple Daily reports.

Posing as reporters, the Silent Majority representatives sought out Yau and the school principal to seek answers to their questions about Yau’s blog, saying the two had been avoiding their phone calls.

The group called Yau a “coward” for failing to own up to his “wrongdoings”.

It also reportedly sent people to school board member Taw Jian Liam’s clinic to ask him about the issue.

Silent Majority was apparently angered by an online article that Yau published on Wednesday, in which he accused the police officers who held a rally in support of their convicted colleagues of supporting violence.

The seven policemen were jailed for two years for beating up pro-democracy activist Ken Tsang during an Occupy protest in Admiralty in October 2014.

Yau likened the officers supporting the seven convicted policemen to Nazi members and supporters who didn’t think there was anything wrong with the mass murder of Jews during the Second World War, adding that the policemen apparently did not reflect on their actions, Ming Pao Daily reported.

In criticizing Silent Majority, Hui said the protesters were wrong in barging into the school to register their opposition to Yau’s article, noting their action disrupted the classes of students.

He also said teachers have freedom of speech, and can voice out their views on social and political issues.

A spokesperson from the Education Bureau said schools must always ensure the safety of their students and provide them with a learning environment free from harassment.

On the other hand, teachers, when discussing controversial topics, should try to remain as neutral as possible, the spokesperson said.

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