Date
20 October 2017
At PappaRich, ingredients are imported from their place of origin. On the right is steamed grouper with coconut. Photo: HKEJ
At PappaRich, ingredients are imported from their place of origin. On the right is steamed grouper with coconut. Photo: HKEJ

PappaRich celebrates authentic Malaysian cuisine

Malaysian restaurants are catching on overseas, offering authentic cuisines and eclectic menus inspired by the country’s cultural diversity.

One such restaurant is PappaRich.

Founded in 2005, PappaRich has more than 70 branches in the country and more than 100 outlets overseas.

L. Place at 139 Queen’s Road Central — the second PappaRich branch in Hong Kong — is the restaurant’s flagship.

Malaysia has a rich and vibrant mix of Chinese, Malays, Indians and Eurasians. Nyonya, Indian and Chinese cuisine defines the country’s unique tastes.

At PappaRich, ingredients are imported from their place of origin. Certain sauces and food have been specially prepared by the central kitchen in Malaysia to ensure diners a truly native Malaysian experience.

Poached Ipoh bean sprouts (with special sauce) is a refreshing dish featuring the renowned Malaysian vegetable.

Grown with spring water, the sprouts are tubbier than the Hong Kong variety. It is crunchy, exotic and goes along with scallions, dried garlic flakes and a special sauce mixed with XO belacan sauce and sweet soy sauce.

Clam in supreme broth uses only fresh clams which are boiled with chilies, garlic and ginger in a chicken broth. The premium-grade Chinese rice wine perfectly blends with the broth, yielding a rich taste of umami out of the clams.

Then there’s kampung, meaning homeland in Malay. Stir-fried kampung chicken with rice wine presents a homey feeling. The marinated chicken pieces are first stir-fried and then cooked in a stew of dried shrimps, freshly grated ginger paste, chicken broth and rice wine.

The stir-fried Sarawak hardshell crab in black pepper sauce uses one-catty hardshell crab which is first marinated in a secret Malay soy sauce and dark soy sauce, then cooked with freshly grated ginger paste and chicken broth and fried with the famous Sarawak white peppercorns and black peppers from England.

It is interesting that the crab is only mildly spicy with a hint of sweetness.

Diehards of the durian fruit must place an order of Musang King durian cheesecake which is a collaboration between celebrity pastry chef Daniel Tay and PappaRich.

The durian mousse sponge cake is freshly prepared in Malaysia and delivered to Hong Kong by air.

An alternative to the durian cake could be the iced three-layer tea, in which milk tea, coconut milk and thick coconut syrup are combined into one silky drink.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on March 7

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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Poached Ipoh bean sprouts with special sauce (left) and clam in supreme broth. Photo: HKEJ


Stir-fried kampung chicken with rice wine (left) and stir-fried Sarawak hardshell crab in black pepper sauce. Photo: HKEJ


Musang King durian cheesecake (left) and iced three-layer tea. Photo: HKEJ


Writer of the Hong Kong Economic Journal

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