Date
27 May 2017
The Danish Embassy in China has received a range of suggestions from Chinese people on how Denmark can resolve an oyster problem. Photo: Weibo
The Danish Embassy in China has received a range of suggestions from Chinese people on how Denmark can resolve an oyster problem. Photo: Weibo

Chinese netizens offer to help Denmark tackle oyster crisis

Chinese netizens have bombarded Denmark with all sorts of proposals after the European nation called for suggestions to help the country deal with an oyster crisis.

Responding to an invitation for ideas to help resolve an explosion of Pacific oysters on Denmark’s beaches, mainlanders put forth various solutions, including offers to consume all the excess oysters.

On Monday, the Danish Embassy in China posted a message online about how the Scandinavian nation’s beaches have been taken over by an oyster species from Asia and the problems being caused by the phenomenon.

In a jocular vein, it asked the Chinese people to come up with suggestions to help contain the crisis. 

Following the message on the embassy’s official Weibo page, Chinese netizens turned in a flurry of proposals, most of which were light-hearted.

Taking note of an invitation to eat Oysters in Denmark, a person suggested, in a post that has garnered thousands of “likes”, that the Danish government could consider issuing multi-year, multi-entry “oyster-eating visas” for the Chinese.

If the new visa is created, all of Denmark’s oysters could be gone in five years, the person wrote.

Meanwhile, another person suggested that Denmark should apply to the Chinese government for permission to export the oysters to the world’s most populous nation.

There were other comments and suggestions, much to the amusement of the embassy officials who had not reckoned with such response to their playful invitation.

According to the Danish authorities, Pacific oysters — an invasive species from Asia, which was introduced to Denmark about a decade ago — have seen their population explode in Demark in recent years, surpassing that of local species and harming the environment.

Both the Danish government and scientists are out of ideas as to how to tackle the issue. They were hoping that people would take the oysters home to eat, but their calls were not actively answered by fellow countrymen.

The embassy noted that the Danish people are too not fond of oysters and that their country only has a population of less than six million.

While the suggestion of “oyster-eating visas” was interesting, officials said there are no plans to relax the visa restrictions at the moment.

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EL/AC/RC

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