Date
26 May 2017
Chinese youth will be better off if they acquire college diplomas in the country before enrolling at US educational institutions, feels Dr. Yang Chenning. Photo: HKEJ
Chinese youth will be better off if they acquire college diplomas in the country before enrolling at US educational institutions, feels Dr. Yang Chenning. Photo: HKEJ

Chinese parents urged not to rush kids into US high schools

Chinese parents should think twice before they send their young children to the United States for secondary education, a Nobel laureate said on Thursday.

Letting children study in the US at a young age could be a “very dangerous” thing as the kids could go astray in the foreign land in terms of lifestyle, warned retired Chinese-American physicist Dr. Yang Chenning.

American society is an indulgent one, where students using drugs can be found in almost every high school, Yang said in an interview streamed live on the website of People’s Daily, the Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece.

Given the general environment, which can be “too extreme” at times, it is easy for a young person to fall prey to bad habits or poor lifestyle choices, said Yang, who received the 1957 Nobel Prize in Physics along with fellow physicist Tsung-dao Lee.

The advice of Yang, who is now 95 years in age, comes as many Chinese parents have been doing everything they can to send their kids to study in the US, the Hong Kong Economic Journal noted.

Well-off Chinese are increasingly sending their children to American schools due to the belief that the US offers a better environment for the kids to grow up while also offering quality education. 

According to Yang, such thinking is wrong, especially when it comes to high schools.

His advice to Chinese parents is this: Send your children to the US for studies only after the kids finish their college education at home in China.

A young person can have a better chance of success by going to a graduate school in the US after acquiring a college diploma in China, Yang said.

The physicist said his advice is based on his long years of living in the US, where he both studied and worked.

Yang’s remarks met with mixed reactions from Chinese netizens.

Some praised him for trying to build the self-confidence of Chinese people, while some suggested that he was being hypocritical.

Yang became a US citizen in 1964 but now resides in China. He renounced his American citizenship in 2015.

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