Date
18 December 2017
Forty-one percent of Hong Kong's working population depended on MTR trains last year for the daily travel, government data suggests. Photo: GIS
Forty-one percent of Hong Kong's working population depended on MTR trains last year for the daily travel, government data suggests. Photo: GIS

Four in 10 HK workers used MTR for daily commute in 2016

MTR has become the most popular means of public transport for Hong Kong workers, with the daily number of passengers from that segment surpassing one million on the local rail network.

According to data released by the Census and Statistics Department on Thursday, the size of working population with fixed workplace remained at above 2.8 million from 2006 to 2016.

In 2006, about 820,000 local workers, representing 29 percent of the working population, travelled to work by MTR.

But by 2016, the number of workers travelling by MTR has increased to 1.16 million, making up 41 percent of the working population.

Eleven years ago, some 310,000 workers, or 11 percent of the working population, went to work on foot, which is considered a healthy and environmentally-friendly mode of transport.

The number has dipped to less than 287,000 people in 2016, making up only ten percent of the working population.

The number of commuters taking a bus to work has dropped from a million 11 years ago, making up 36 percent of the work force then, to 780,000 people in 2016, equivalent to 27 percent of the working population.

The number of people who opted to take a mini bus to their office has dropped to 190,000 people in 2016, representing 6.7 percent of the working population.

As for students, some 430,000 pupils went to school on foot in 2006, making up for 34 percent of the full-time students in Hong Kong.

That number has shrunk to 300,000 in 2016, representing only 27.5 percent of the student body.

Meanwhile, the number of pupils taking the MTR to school has increased from 180,000 in 2006 to 270,000 in 2016.

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