Date
19 September 2017
Hong Kong authorities are reported to be conducting tests on some egg samples after a woman complained about possible sale of contaminated poultry items in the city. Photo: Reuters
Hong Kong authorities are reported to be conducting tests on some egg samples after a woman complained about possible sale of contaminated poultry items in the city. Photo: Reuters

FEHD looking into complaint about contaminated eggs

The Food and Environmental Hygiene Department (FEHD) is said to be looking into a complaint from a woman over possible sale of contaminated eggs in the city.

Apple Daily reports that a woman surnamed Wong raised an alert about a batch of imported eggs from the United States, saying she suspects they may not be safe.

According to the report, Wong bought a pack of 15 US brown eggs from a DCH Mart in Sha Tin on August 25. When she made a hard-boiled egg on Friday, she found that there were black spots on the egg. The same problem existed when she cooked nine more eggs from the same batch.

Wong called the FEHD and had the ten boiled eggs taken for inspection on Sunday.

An employee of DCH Mart has confirmed that FEHD officials have been to the shop to take some samples for investigation, the paper said.

Meanwhile, the eggs in question are still available on shop shelves.

A person who works with the supplier, Hoi Yuen Eggs Company, was quoted as saying that the reported case may be an isolated incident.

Hoi Yuen conducted spot quality checks on the batch of 48,000 eggs when they were imported into Hong Kong, said the person who gave his surname as Yeung.

Yeung said he has dealt with similar cases before and that he suspects the eggs may have been put under room temperature for too long a period, causing the problem.

Vital Health Livestock Development Managing Director Kwok Ming-cheung, who possesses a Master’s degree in poultry nutrition from Canada, said there could be two reasons for the black spots.

Either it is that the uterus of the hen was damaged, which subsequently affected the tissues, or the egg could be contaminated due to cracks on the shells, he said.

Meanwhile, another woman surnamed Lee also reported 12 problematic eggs which she said were bought from a store in Siu Sai Wan last Friday.

Lee asked for a refund from the shop but was refused.

The woman then decided to throw away the eggs with black spots, and vowed that she will not patronize the shop in future.

According to Leung Kam-tong, a veteran egg seller in Kowloon City market, the stuff bought by Lee may have been bad eggs.

Leung suspected that the eggs could have been imported from Southeast Asian countries, saying the relatively higher water content in the eggs from the region can turn the stuff bad.

Leung added that some shops may have stored their stock for too long, causing the eggs to go bad.

Holding an egg in front of a light bulb is a simple way to gauge the egg’s freshness, he said. If any black spots are seen, it indicates that the egg has gone bad.

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