Date
26 September 2017
A recent survey on standardizing the number of school hours for students has revealed that over 90 percent of  interviewees agree that a limit should be set. Photo: CNSA
A recent survey on standardizing the number of school hours for students has revealed that over 90 percent of interviewees agree that a limit should be set. Photo: CNSA

No more than 7 hours of classes for students, survey suggests

More than 90 percent of students, parents and concern groups are in favor of limiting “study hours” to reduce stress and help prevent suicides, according to an ongoing survey.

The survey is being conducted by the Reclaiming Social Work movement between July and October, hk01.com reports.

More than half of the respondents agreed that the limit for the number of standard school hours should be under seven.

As of Saturday, 631 students, parents, teachers and social workers had done the questionnaire online or in person.

About 93.6 percent of the interviewees said there should be a standardised amount of class time for students.

And 52.6 percent said that seven hours of standardised learning time would be best for students while 19.3 percent agreed that five hours is the most appropriate.

The scope of the learning time should include extra classes or tutorial classes, or any other sort of academic-related learning.

Parents’ Union spokesperson Cheung Yim-king said the minimum requirement should be less than seven hours and that after school there should be no homework or extra tutorials.

She said that the time after school is supposed to be the best time for parents and children to establish relationships.

Lai Pak-yin, the survey’s spokesman, said the main reason for stress in students is school work, which in turn has been blamed for student suicides, according to Apple Daily.

Students spend more than 10 hours on school work, and the student-to-teacher ratio is among the worst in the world.

Lai said discussions are continuing on standardizing the study hours for students, which would allow them to explore other interests and have fun.

He said schools should adopt guidelines on when to encourage students to relax.

Meanwhile, legislative councilor Shiu Ka-chun led a protest in Mong Kok to dramatize the plight of stressed-out students.

Shiu said he would continue to express his views to education authorities. The Education Bureau has yet to respond to the survey.

- Contact us at [email protected]

EL/BN/RA

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe