Date
17 October 2017
While China's big spenders are willing to splurge on "experience" and "vibes", budget travelers prefer "one price for all" packages. Photo: Xinhua
While China's big spenders are willing to splurge on "experience" and "vibes", budget travelers prefer "one price for all" packages. Photo: Xinhua

Three types of personas of Chinese travelers explained

With China’s National Day golden week fast approaching, around 589 million Chinese people are expected to travel at home or go abroad.

What are some of the different travel personas in China? How different are they from each other?

Xaxis, a leading media and technology platform, has offered some insights into their characteristics, based on a survey of 5,440 respondents planning to travel to scenic spots at home and abroad to spend the seven-day break.

On the go

These frequent travelers are usually of the younger generation, and most of them still do not have kids. They were mostly born after the 1980s, often the single child in the family.

With the rise of the Chinese economy, these “products” of the one-child policy came from financially secure families and received good education amid rapid advances in technology.

This situation has opened them up to more information, making them more open and sophisticated, eager to explore the world and experience a different lifestyle.

As such, they travel frequently and are willing to pay for “experience” and “vibes” such as art, music concerts, etc. They tend to always search for information, arrange their itineraries through digital means, and plan their trips on their own.

In order to tap the massive consumption power of this new generation, travel service providers should highlight cultural learning and unique life experiences, instead of providing the usual travel information.

Family travelers 

Another type of travel pattern is family trips.

Most of these middle-class travelers have to take care of their young kids. They believe that travel can broaden their kids’ horizon, so they choose to travel with their kids during school vacations. Some may even include a stop at renowned foreign institutions like Harvard and Yale to motivate their children.

This requires detailed planning to ensure smooth and hassle-free travel for them and their kids. They would expect the tour to be manageable, relaxing and full of fun with lots of parent-child activities.

The peak travel season includes public holidays in summer and winter. Promotions to attract these travelers should be done about six weeks in advance. Focus should be on family fun and learning.

Budget savers

There are still quite a big number of people with limited disposable income in China. They are mostly migrant workers in cities like Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, where rents and living expenses are high. They also include people in lower-tier cities with lower income. For these people, travel, especially overseas, is still considered a luxury.

They are usually quite price-sensitive, and seldom pay for items they do not regard as necessities. They usually do not attend concerts like some “on-the-go travelers” do. For travel, they prefer consulting travel agencies and looking for the best price. Free offers and discounts appeal to them quite a lot.

Discount information and “one price for all” would also be appealing to these travelers.

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FC/CG

Infographics highlighting the main types of Chinese travelers as well as their consumption habits and characteristics. Graphic: Xaxis


Family travelers are mostly from the middle class who go overseas with their kids. Graphic: Xaxis


Budget savers are mostly migrant workers in cities like Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, where rents and living expenses are high. Graphic: Xaxis


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