Date
19 November 2017
Legislator Lam Cheuk-ting (left) said he will seek help from UK authorities regarding the controversial agreement between former Chief Executive Leung Chun-Ying (right) and Australian firm UGL. Photo: HKEJ/CNSA
Legislator Lam Cheuk-ting (left) said he will seek help from UK authorities regarding the controversial agreement between former Chief Executive Leung Chun-Ying (right) and Australian firm UGL. Photo: HKEJ/CNSA

Legislator seeks help from UK authorities on CY Leung’s UGL saga

Democratic Party lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting said he would seek the help of British authorities to dig deeper into the UGL saga involving former Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.

Lam, a member of the Legislative Council select committee looking into the UGL case, said he had already sent emails to the National Crime Agency and HM Revenue & Customs to report the case.

UGL is an Australian engineering company that took over DTZ, a United Kingdom-listed real estate services firm in which Leung was a board director. As part of the agreement, UGL paid Leung HK$50 million in installments in 2012 and 2013.

Since the payments were made during Leung’s incumbency as chief executive, the fact that he did not declare the transactions raised public concerns about propriety and legality.

Lam was scheduled to arrive in London next Monday with Junius Ho Kwan-yiu, a fellow member of the Legco inquiry panel, for a five-day trip to interview relevant officials. 

But Lam has decided to head to Britain this Friday to pursue the case.

Lam, a former investigator of the Independent Commission Against Corruption, said the National Crime Agency has the authority to investigate any corporation based in the UK, and that includes DTZ.

Even if it is proved that Leung’s receipt of payments from UGL was legal, and not an advantage, the HM Revenue & Customs can investigate whether Leung has paid all the taxes for the payments he has received.

Lam noted that since some of the DTZ stakeholders were not properly informed of the UGL deal, Leung could still be prosecuted for corruption. 

Lam also said he has been in contact with human rights advocate Benedict Rogers, who was denied entry to Hong Kong last month, but they would not meet up in the UK as he is currently elsewhere.

However, Rogers has agreed to help Lam meet some members of the UK parliament to talk about the implementation of the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the “one country, two systems” principle.

– Contact us at [email protected]

EL/BN/CG

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe