Date
18 October 2018
In screening applicants for Secondary 1 Discretionary Places, Queen's College seeks pupils who will not only study hard but can also think flexibly. Photo: HKEJ
In screening applicants for Secondary 1 Discretionary Places, Queen's College seeks pupils who will not only study hard but can also think flexibly. Photo: HKEJ

Queen’s College seeks flexible thinking skills in P6 applicants

As it screens new applicants for Secondary 1 classes, Queen’s College, a prestigious secondary school for boys, is seeking out pupils who demonstrate an ability to focus on solving everyday problems through flexible thinking.

The school, located in Causeway Bay, received about 30 applications on Tuesday, the first day of the Discretionary Places (DP) stage for the next school year, a number similar to what had been seen in the previous year.

It asked students for the first time to submit no more than 20 certificates of extracurricular activities this year, claiming that the purpose of setting the limit is it wants applicants to focus on what they are really good at, Apple Daily reports.

Chiu Siu-hang, the school’s assistant principal, revealed that students are picked on the basis of three main criteria — interview performance (45 percent), academic studies (40 percent), and extracurricular activities (15 percent).

The school feels it is not necessary for parents to send their children to learn interview skills because it expects to see the true and natural side of applicants, Chiu said.

The institution has selected about 200 out of some 600 applicants for interviews during the past two years, he said.

Beginning Tuesday, students applying for Secondary 1 Discretionary Places for the next school year through the Secondary School Places Allocation (SSPA) system were allowed to submit applications to the secondary schools in which they want to study.

At this DP stage, each Primary 6 (P6) pupil can apply for two secondary schools at most.

According to Chiu, the interview at the DP stage determines how well students can use their scientific knowledge to solve real-life problems.

That is aimed at making sure that the pupils will not only study hard but also are capable of thinking flexibly.

Apple Daily quoted a parent as saying that his son wants to enter Queen’s College partly because the school has a baseball team he would like to join.

The kid hopes to enjoy life as a student  and avoid the stressful life of the working class, the man said.

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