Date
16 October 2018
Police have launched an investigation into letters posted from Japan offering money for the lives of Secretary for Justice Teresa Cheng and two returning officers. The letters (inset) carry their photos. Photo: HKEJ/Internet
Police have launched an investigation into letters posted from Japan offering money for the lives of Secretary for Justice Teresa Cheng and two returning officers. The letters (inset) carry their photos. Photo: HKEJ/Internet

Police probe letters offering money for justice secretary’s life

Police have launched an investigation into letters offering money for the lives of Secretary for Justice Teresa Cheng Yeuk-wah and two returning officers involved in the recent Legislative Council by-elections, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

Two pro-establishment lawmakers, Elizabeth Quat Pui-fan from the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong and Michael Luk Chung-hung from the Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions, filed a report with the police headquarters in Wan Chai on Wednesday night after they said they received the same letter, mainly written in Chinese and posted from Japan.

The police listed the case as criminal intimidation. No arrests have been made so far.

It is understood that the letter was sent by a person claiming to be the chairperson of an association in Japan.

In the letter, the writer accused the pro-establishment camp of sparing no effort in having six pan-democratic lawmakers disqualified.

As such, the lives of the justice minister and two returning officers-Anne Teng Yu-yan and Amy Chan Yuen-man – should be taken to pay for the debt they owed to hundreds of thousands of voters who saw their votes raped by the trio, according to the letter writer, who also offered monetary rewards to those who could do the job.

Teng is the returning officer in charge of the Hong Kong Island constituency, while Chan is her counterpart in charge of the New Territories East constituency.

Some of the six disqualified lawmakers were elected in the two constituencies.

Luk said the letter contained a lot of words insulting China and thoughts about Hong Kong independence. He said he suspects the sender is an independence advocate. He described the act as close to that of a terrorist.

The lawmaker said the letter was a serious provocation to Hong Kong’s rule of law and electoral system.

The Department of Justice said it has reported the incident to the police but declined to comment further.

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TL/JC/CG

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