Date
16 October 2018
Chief Executive Carrie Lam got failing markets in still the protection of Hong Kong’s freedom and human rights, and promotion of further development of the city's democracy, according to the survey. Photo: HKEJ
Chief Executive Carrie Lam got failing markets in still the protection of Hong Kong’s freedom and human rights, and promotion of further development of the city's democracy, according to the survey. Photo: HKEJ

Lam capable, trustworthy but unable to push for democracy: poll

Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor is a capable leader in the eyes of Hong Kong people, but she is also considered to have failed in advancing the city’s democracy, according to a survey conducted by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

The survey by CUHK’s Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies was based on phone interviews with 712 adults between June 19 and 26.

Respondents were asked to rate the chief executive’s performance in 10 categories, with a point scale from 0 to 100 and 50 as the passing mark.

According to the results unveiled on Monday, Lam scored 59.5 points in competence, her highest in all categories, followed by trustworthiness and incorruptibility, in which she scored 56.3 and 56.1 points, respectively, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

While Lam passed eight of the 10 categories, she still failed in two, namely protection of Hong Kong’s freedom and human rights, where she scored 49 points, and promotion of further development of Hong Kong’s democracy, for which she was given 44.5 points.

The survey also found although performance scores given to Lam did not differ much in terms of respondents’ gender and education level, they did among different age groups and social hierarchies.

Those aged 51 or above and those self-classified as middle upper class or upper class generally gave Lam higher ratings than those in other groups.

The lowest ratings came from those aged between 18 and 30 and those who classified themselves as lower class or lower middle class.

Meanwhile, 31 British parliamentarians from both the House of Lords and the House of Commons and from different parties asked the foreign secretary to monitor and promote Hong Kong’s rule of law and basic freedoms.

Under the Sino-British Joint Declaration, the United Kingdom has the obligation to do so until 2047, the end of the handover period, according to their joint letter dated July 6.

They said Hong Kong’s rule of law and basic freedoms have been under pressure from Beijing’s movess.

They asked the foreign secretary to “raise [those] concerns through high-level diplomacy and publicly by issuing a recommendation at the United Nations Universal Periodic Review”.

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TL/JC/CG

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