Date
17 December 2018
Heng Fa Chuen in Chai Wan, which was among the severely hit places in Sunday’s typhoon , saw a huge amount  of garbage washed up onto the streets outside the MTR Station. Photo: HKEJ
Heng Fa Chuen in Chai Wan, which was among the severely hit places in Sunday’s typhoon , saw a huge amount of garbage washed up onto the streets outside the MTR Station. Photo: HKEJ

Housing estates see residents pitch in for post-Mangkhut cleanup

Following the damage wrought by Typhoon Mangkhut, some housing estates and local communities have seen their residents get together to help speed up the clean-up and recovery efforts.

Heng Fa Chuen, a private residential estate in Chai Wan, was one such place where citizens took up voluntary work in a big way in the spirit of self-help and cooperation.

Taking note of the huge amount of garbage that washed up to the beautiful promenade outside the seaside housing complex, residents launched a joint effort spontaneously on Monday to clear the debris and trash.

Adults as well as children participated in the effort, picking up marine waste and removing fallen tree branches, among things, to help bring the area back to normal, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

The initiative came even as some people were still without water supply or electricity and had to rely on water tankers sent over by the Water Supplies Department.

Elsewhere, Tai O also saw similar relief work by the local residents.

In the fishing town, many trees collapsed due to Mangkhut’s powerful winds, crashing at least three stilt houses.

As residents got busy to restore their environment, one of them said the losses could have been heavier had it not been for the pre-typhoon efforts from volunteers who helped the elderly move home appliances to higher places.

In the coastal village of Lei Yue Mun, famous for its seafood, restaurant owners had done everything they could to minimize losses but the places were still pounded by waves that flooded.

A restaurant there said it needs to carry out large-scale cleaning and repair, so it is not sure when it will be able to reopen for business.

Among other business establishments in the village, a coffee shop owner estimated he will lose at least HK$100,000 as was the case last year after Typhoon Hato caused flooding on his premises.

In Tseung Kwan O, which witnessed tsunami-like waves that turned many streets into small creeks, a number of students and residents jointly committed themselves to street cleaning work.

That came as foul smell from the catchpits permeated some areas, including Tong Chun Street.

In other related news, a spokesperson for CLP Power, one of Hong Kong’s two power utilities, said about 13,500 of its customers were still without electricity as of 3 pm Monday.

The affected were mainly in the New Territories North, Yuen Long and Sai Kung.

The number of affected customers has decreased to about 7,500 as of 7 am on Tuesday, the company said in a media release.

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/JC/RC

Residents of Tseung Kwan O, another severely hit area, teamed up for street cleaning work to help restore normalcy to the community. Photo: Internet


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