Date
21 November 2018
Ricky Yu (inset) is set to retire after spending nearly 40 years with the ICAC, where he handled several high-profile corruption cases involving government officials and others. Photos: Bloomberg, HKEJ
Ricky Yu (inset) is set to retire after spending nearly 40 years with the ICAC, where he handled several high-profile corruption cases involving government officials and others. Photos: Bloomberg, HKEJ

Ricky Yu to retire from ICAC after 39-year graftbusting career

A veteran investigations officer of the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) is set to retire by the end of this week after serving the organization for nearly 40 years, with colleagues and observers deeming his departure as a big loss to the anti-graft agency.

Ricky Yu Chun-cheong, the anti-corruption watchdog’s director of investigation (government sector), will begin his pre-retirement leave this Saturday when his 39 years of crime-fighting career officially ends, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

In a recent media interview, Yu recalled that he had joined the ICAC right after graduating from secondary school.

Yu has worked for the organization since, without changing his career path or job.

Starting as assistant investigator, he gradually moved his way up the ranking ladder after he solved multiple high-profile corruption cases involving top government officials.

Among the cases he handled was the misuse of office allegations pertaining to former Hong Kong chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen and former chief secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan.

The sincere approach to corruption cases involving the rich and famous earned Yu much praise from the public. The official was referred to as a “god-like inspector” by some observers, but Yu was always humble about his achievements and refused to take personal credit for agency successes.

Any ICAC probe could not be handled by one single person, and all the cases solved by the agency were a team effort, Yu has said.

The anti-graft agency has much to be proud of, but it cannot afford to be complacent, the official said. 

Asked about the internal promotion system, which has caused the ICAC to come under fire in recent year, Yu believed the system is still effective. But he suggested that all of the agency’s departments should take heed of criticism so as to improve themselves.

In July 2016, Rebecca Li Bo-lan, then acting head of ICAC’s Operations Department, abruptly left office for unknown reasons and was succeeded by Ricky Yau Shu-chun, who had not been officially promoted to the post until August this year.

As Yau had not been officially appointed head of the department for more than two years, it has raised concerns about the agency’s operations.

Yu said the ICAC had met even bigger challenges in the past, and that it is capable enough to deal with any adversities.

Looking to the future, Yu urged the ICAC to step up training to equip staff with more technological knowledge and recruit more forensic accounting staff, as he believes high-tech crimes will only become be more rampant.

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/JC/RC

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe