Date
20 November 2018
Hong Kong now has 11 universities after the government approved the application of Hang Seng Management College for a change of its status. Photo: HKEJ
Hong Kong now has 11 universities after the government approved the application of Hang Seng Management College for a change of its status. Photo: HKEJ

HSMC becomes second private university in Hong Kong

The Hang Seng Management College (HSMC) has been granted the status of a university, becoming the 11th such institution and only the second private university in Hong Kong.

The Chief Executive in Council approved its application to change its status on Tuesday. The school will now be called “The Hang Seng University of Hong Kong” and “香港恒生大學” in Chinese.

The first private university in the city is Shue Yan University, which was granted that status in December 2006.

Located in Siu Lek Yuen in Sha Tin, HSMC was restructured from the former Hang Seng School of Commerce, which was established in 1980, to become a degree-granting and self-financed tertiary institution in 2010 before it filed an application for the university status, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reported.

Congratulating HSMC for its new status, Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung Yun-hung said the development of private universities added diversity to Hong Kong’s higher education system and provided a channel for all sectors of society to contribute their effort and resources for the benefit of students.

The HSMC expressed its gratitude to the government for their recognition of the institution’s achievements, and the stakeholders for their contributions.

It is understood that HSMC students who are graduating in December will be able to see the school’s new title printed on their diplomas. No new diplomas will be issued to past graduates, however.

Li Cheung-kuk, president of the school’s students’ union, said he had a hunch that the application would be approved after he saw members of the Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications conducting an on-campus inspection in May and June this year. Still, the official announcement on Tuesday surprised him, he said.

Li said the change in status will definitely help enhance the school’s reputation and bring in more resources. However, he hopes the upgrade will not be used to justify tuition hikes in the future.

Lawmaker Ip Kin-yuen, who represents the education sector, urged the government to upgrade the status of other tertiary institutions that meet the requirements to become universities as soon as possible.

Doing so will help improve the city’s higher education system, Ip said.

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TL/JC/CG

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