Date
20 November 2018
A file pictures shows a robotic arm demonstrating the autonomous battery and payload changing abilities of an Optimus-01 drone at the Airobotics headquarters in Petah Tikva. Israel has been charging ahead in tech innovation. Photo: Bloomberg
A file pictures shows a robotic arm demonstrating the autonomous battery and payload changing abilities of an Optimus-01 drone at the Airobotics headquarters in Petah Tikva. Israel has been charging ahead in tech innovation. Photo: Bloomberg

Towards a future with intelligent mobility

Just think of how many hours we’ve wasted every week sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic… Can you imagine how intelligent mobility and the end of traditional mass transit will look like? Or even can you imagine how the future action movies will look like whereas all that we know about transportation is about to change?

Start by imagining: people traveling in hyperloops between cities and ordering flying taxis with an app; drones crisscrossing the air delivering packages; roads filled with driverless cars; flights to space, greener cities with infrastructures for various e-bikes and robotic horses – well, coming soon…

Meanwhile, here are a few things I have learned during the Smart Mobility Summit 2018.

1. The automotive industry is currently excited by possible disruptions arising from technological and societal trends such as electric, autonomous and smart mobility. These trends are attacking the very foundation of the business models employed by established players and existing supplier structures. In particular, a new cultural behavior whereby people are “consuming mobility” rather than buying cars may have a major impact on current players.

2. “In order for cars to be truly connected, at least 5th generation level communications and high-level data security are required. For example, the various systems require ongoing software updates, but it is clear to all of us that such updates in a vehicle traveling at a speed of 200 kilometers per hour are a matter of life and death and must have information security to prevent burglaries to the system.” – HARMAN President and CEO Dinesh Paliwal

3. Smart regulation – For decades, many governments have tried to develop solutions to address transportation and mobility challenges. It’s time for a new approach as without smart government involvement, it will be very difficult to advance in development and innovation and fit global standards, therefore governments must cooperate as to implement smart regulation that will allow all smart mobility to happen.

4. “At the end of the day, philosophical and ethical questions must be reduced to concepts that cars and machines are capable of “understanding” and acting on them… a machine needs a clear definition of what is “dangerous,” and what is the right response to a dangerous situation.” – Prof. Amnon Shashua

5. Israel’s ambitious goal of reducing 60 percent of the country’s oil consumption by 2025 is a sign that governments can clearly see that the time is ripe for a revolution in transportation, for a world free of oil, populated by clean, accessible and efficient means of transportation.

6. Israel is charging into Smart Mobility space! Of the 500 plus start-ups in the automobile & mobility sector, 40 percent involves in smart mobility, such as navigation, shared car, fleet management, parking. There are also substantial number of startups in vehicle technology, electric mobility and autonomous mobility.

7. Over US$4 billion has been invested in the whole sector of transportation in the last few years. Some of bigger investments are Gett ($300M, 2016) VIA ($200M, 2017), Moovit ($100M, 2015) Innovitz ($73M, 2017), StoreDot ($60M, 2017), Phinergy ($50M, 2016). These startups would become very good targets for acquisition. So far buyers are mostly US corporations, such as Google in acquiring Maze ($1.15B) and Intel in Mobileye ($15.3B), but China companies should have strong interests to take advantage of the market potential such technologies in in their home turf.

8. Strong partnerships with Israeli innovative companies could be a significant competitive advantage for Chinese leading companies and even provinces and science parks wishing to build and grow their smart mobility abilities and know how. Just think of it, all startups that develop solutions requiring hardware changes or integration into existing automotive systems and components target OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers. If the Chinese OEM accepts the technology, the startups can partner up with a Tier 1 supplier for system integration and ultimately production.

– Contact us at [email protected]

RC

HKEJ contributor

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