Date
16 July 2019
The pro-establishment camp is dead set on taking back solid control of the Sham Shui Po District Council in the election this November. Photo: HKEJ
The pro-establishment camp is dead set on taking back solid control of the Sham Shui Po District Council in the election this November. Photo: HKEJ

Pro-Beijing camp goes for the jugular in Sham Shui Po DC poll

Sham Shui Po is likely to be a major battleground for the different contending parties in the District Council elections in November this year.

At present, there are 23 elected members in the Sham Shui Po District Council. Not counting the establishment-leaning chairman Ambrose Cheung Wing-sum, both the pro-Beijing and pro-democracy camps hold 11 seats each.

Some pro-establishment members of the Sham Shui Po DC have complained about the excessively long meetings, which they blame on the pan-dems’ contentious attitude, and bewailed the fact that pan-dems, especially with the help of an establishment-leaning member, have succeeded in pushing some of their motions through the council.

As such, the pro-Beijing camp is dead set on taking back solid control of the Sham Shui Po DC this time around.

In order to achieve that goal, the camp is aiming their guns at the pro-democracy Hong Kong Association for Democracy and People’s Livelihood (ADPL), which currently holds seven seats in the council.

Yeung Yuk, vice chairman of the ADPL and an incumbent Sham Shui Po DC member, told us that judging from the way the pro-establishment camp is running its election campaign, it appears determined to “turn the tables” on the pan-democrats in the November race.

Yeung also acknowledged that the two by-elections for the vacant seats in Kowloon West last year have taken a heavy toll on ADPL’s popularity.

That’s because before the by-poll in November last year, ADPL members had to take sides on whether to endorse the candidacy of Frederick Fung Kin-kee, who is a former chairman and co-founder of the party.

Yeung said the divisions within the party over the issue have inevitably alienated some long-time party stalwarts.

He described the pro-Beijing camp’s full-court press against the ADPL as a bid to move in for the kill at a time when the party is weak.

As to whether there is still room for cooperation between the ADPL and Fung, Yeung said his party has not had any unpleasant terms with Fung ever since he quit as chairman.

That said, Yeung didn’t rule out the possibility that some of their candidates may ask Fung to campaign for them.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Feb 15

Translation by Alan Lee

[Chinese version 中文版]

– Contact us at [email protected]

JC/CG

Columnist of Hong Kong Economic Journal.

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe