Date
20 July 2019
French President Emmanuel Macron addresses his nation from the Elysee Palace on Tuesday following a massive fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral the previous day. Pool photo via Reuters
French President Emmanuel Macron addresses his nation from the Elysee Palace on Tuesday following a massive fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral the previous day. Pool photo via Reuters

Macron hopes Notre-Dame can be rebuilt in five years

French President Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday that he hopes the Notre-Dame cathedral, which was ravaged by a fire on Monday, can be rebuilt in five years and that the French people will pull together to repair their national symbol.

“We will rebuild Notre-Dame even more beautifully and I want it to be completed in five years, we can do it,” Macron said in a televised address, Reuters reports.

“It is up to us to convert this disaster into an opportunity to come together, having deeply reflected on what we have been and what we have to be and become better than we are. It is up to us to find the thread of our national project.”

Macron devoted a brief prime-time televised address to the catastrophic blaze in the heart of the capital, again postponing planned remarks on his response to months of anti-government protests.

“This is not a time for politics,” said Macron, who had cancelled a speech planned on Monday evening on the response to the “yellow vest” protests.

The president visited the site of the fire late on Monday and promised then to rebuild the cathedral, parts of which date to the 12th century.

The cathedral spire was destroyed and its roof gutted but the bell towers were still standing and many valuable art works were saved after more than 400 firemen worked to contain the blaze, finally quelling it 14 hours after it began.

As the city and the country grieved for a potent national symbol, billionaires, companies and local authorities were quick to offer donations.

Some 24 hours after the fire started, more than 750 million euros (US$845 million) had been pledged, including 500 million from the three billionaire families that own France’s giant luxury goods empires: Kering, LVMH and L’Oreal.

Paris public prosecutor Remy Heitz said there was no obvious indication the fire was arson. Fifty people were working on what would be a long and complex investigation, officials said.

The fire swiftly ripped through the cathedral’s oak roof supports, where workmen had been carrying out extensive renovations to the spire’s timber-framed supports. Police began questioning the workers involved, the prosecutor’s office said.

One firefighter was injured but no one else was hurt, with the fire starting at around 6:30 pm after the building was closed to the public for the evening.

Firefighters examined the facade, with its spectacular 10-metre filigreed stained-glass rose window still intact. They could be seen walking atop the belfries as police kept the area in lockdown.

Investigators will not be able to enter the cathedral’s blackened nave until experts are satisfied its walls withstood the heat and the building is structurally sound.

The company carrying out the renovation works when the blaze broke out said it will cooperate fully with the investigation.

Considered among the finest examples of European Gothic architecture, Notre-Dame is visited by more than 13 million people a year, Reuters noted.

It sits on an island in the Seine, overlooking the Left Bank hangouts of Ernest Hemingway and Pablo Picasso.

“Notre-Dame de Paris is the cathedral of the people, of the people of Paris, of the French people, of the people of the world. It is part of those references of our history, of what we have in common, of what we share,” said Christophe Castaner, France’s Interior Minister.

It was at Notre-Dame that Henry VI of England was crowned “King of France” in 1431, that Napoleon was made emperor in 1804, and Pope Pius X beatified Joan of Arc in 1909. 

– Contact us at [email protected]

RC

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe