Date
24 July 2019
Following a massive rally on Sunday, some anti-extradition bill protesters stayed on the roads the next morning, calling for total withdrawal of the controversial legislation. Photo: RTHK
Following a massive rally on Sunday, some anti-extradition bill protesters stayed on the roads the next morning, calling for total withdrawal of the controversial legislation. Photo: RTHK

Protesters vow more action until fugitive bill fully withdrawn

Following the massive rally yesterday, thousands of protesters stayed on Harcourt Road in the Admiralty area well into Monday morning, with some vowing not to let up until Chief Executive Carrie Lam withdraws the extradition bill altogether and resigns from her post.

Although Lam announced that she has abandoned her legislative push, for now, of the controversial bill that will allow extraditions to mainland China, and also said she was sorry over the way the government had handled the issue, the anger of many citizens remained unabated.

Several people remained on the streets Monday morning before eventually ending their occupation, amid barricades set up at Harcourt Road and Tim Wa Avenue. 

Lam said at press conference on Saturday that the extradition bill is being put off, effectively suspending the legislative process indefinitely.

But activists feared the administration could take up the bill once again after the Legislative Council’s summer break, and hence called for total withdrawal of the plan.

As such, the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF) stuck to its original plan to stage a massive protest once again on Sunday with five demands — the bill must be retracted, Lam must resign, police must retract their characterization of the June 12 protest as a riot, drop any plans to prosecute arrested student protesters, and pin responsibility on police officers for using force against demonstrators.

The group criticized Lam for apologizing only for deficiencies in the government’s work rather than for pushing for the “evil bill” and police oppression, describing the move as insulting and fooling Hongkongers, who will definitely not accept it.

It also warned that there will be more action if the government continues to ignore the public’s demands.

After Sunday’s massive rally, which organizers claim almost two million people attended, thousands continued to stay on Harcourt Road. 

At around 7 am, a group of police officers, which had kept a low profile during the Sunday march walked down Harcourt Road, claiming that they were inviting members of the public to leave the occupied road, ahead of the morning rush hour.

Lung Wo Road and Queensway were cleared and were open to traffic on Monday morning.

At around 10:30 am, protesters staying on Harcourt Road finally left the road after a debate on the future course of action. Some were seen clearing the roadblocks they set up. The road reopened for traffic.

Only a few police officers were spotted standing guard outside the Legislative Council building, dressed in normal uniforms without any helmets, shields or riot gear.

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