Date
22 October 2019
The City University of Hong Kong's Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences presents the results of its study on happiness and satisfaction levels among Hong Kong and Singaporean adolescents. Photo: CityU
The City University of Hong Kong's Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences presents the results of its study on happiness and satisfaction levels among Hong Kong and Singaporean adolescents. Photo: CityU

HK youngsters less happy than Singaporean peers: CityU study

Hong Kong adolescents have lower levels of happiness and satisfaction with the quality of life than their Singapore counterparts, according to a university study.

The City University of Hong Kong’s department of social and behavioral sciences conducted a survey aiming to understand the attitude of young people in both cities towards happiness and their level of satisfaction with the quality of life in 11 areas, including “political and social”, “medical and healthcare”, “law and order”, “social welfare” and “educational” conditions.

A total of 2,304 questionnaires were collected for the survey, which was conducted from January to early June this year.

According to the survey, local respondents scored 6.8 points on the “happiness index”, with 10 being the highest, while those in Singapore scored 7.48. The level of satisfaction of Hong Kong youths in the aforementioned 11 areas was also lower than that of the Singaporeans.

For Hong Kong respondents, the happiness index and level of satisfaction towards law and order saw a serious drop, compared with previous results.

Hongkongers were most dissatisfied with housing conditions as well as the political and social environment, scoring only 3.87, 4.79 and 4.87 points respectively in those areas, or below the passing standard.

As for Singapore teenagers, they were most unhappy with cultural inheritance and employment opportunities, scoring only 7.09 points in both areas.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong youths were most satisfied with entertainment and leisure, although their score was only 6.75 points, which was the lowest for the Singaporeans in all the 11 items.

Professor Dennis Wong Sing-wing, who is in charge of the study, said the violence triggered by the anti-extradition bill movement would only stir up more dissatisfaction and hatred among Hong Kong youths.

Wong said youngsters resorting to violence could get hurt, and those who get upset for failing to achieve any results with their protests could become depressed.

He said both the government and youngsters should try harder to understand and settle their differences.

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WL/RT/CG