Date
21 January 2017
ADPL’s Frederick Fung (L) and Democratic Party's Emily Lau (C) are among the lawmakers who have been invited for talks as Leung Chun-ying (R) seeks to pass a controversial political reform bill. Photos: HKEJ
ADPL’s Frederick Fung (L) and Democratic Party's Emily Lau (C) are among the lawmakers who have been invited for talks as Leung Chun-ying (R) seeks to pass a controversial political reform bill. Photos: HKEJ

Leung confident about passage of political reform bill

Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying said he remains confident about securing 13 to 14 votes from pan-democrats for the political reform bill that the government will table in the legislature next week in relation to universal suffrage in 2017.

The word “confident” was used eight times by Leung, without explaining the reason for his optimism, Ming Pao Daily News reported Wednesday.

Leung said the government has displayed great sincerity with regard to the reform proposal and has made the most of the political space allowed by the National People’s Congress.

Chief Secretary Carrie Lam and Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam are meeting with members of the pan-democrat camp on April 15 and 16.

Legislators Emily Lau and Albert Ho from the Democratic Party, as well as Charles Mok, Kenneth Leung, Frederick Fung and Peter Cheung, have been invited to the meetings with Lam and Tam, while People Power and the Civic Party were left out.

Civic Party’s Alan Leong said the government is trying to split the pan-democratic camp by labeling political parties such as the Democratic Party and Hong Kong Association for Democracy and People’s Livelihood (ADPL) as possible targets for lobbying.

ADPL’s Frederick Fung also said the government is trying to snare legislators who are willing to sit down for a discussion, while People Power’s Albert Chan said he is worried that some members of the pan-democratic camp could change their minds and vote in favor of the government’s proposal.

Chan called on the public to continue to exert pressure on the pan-democrats.

Lawmaker Ip Kwok-him said the pan-democrats were more worried about not being able to enter the chief executive race in 2017, and thus they have made public their determination to vote down the political reform proposal.

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EL/JP/RC

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