Date
23 January 2017
Police officers stand near a barricade on Nathan Road in Mong Kok district during the Occupy pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong last year. The police have been accused of using excessive force to control the situation. Photo: Bloomberg
Police officers stand near a barricade on Nathan Road in Mong Kok district during the Occupy pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong last year. The police have been accused of using excessive force to control the situation. Photo: Bloomberg

Two men sue police for HK$20 mln for alleged Occupy assault

Two men filed a lawsuit in the High Court against the commissioner of police, seeking compensation of at least HK$10 million (US$1.29 million) for each, for alleged brutality by some police officers during the Occupy protests late last year.

The two claimants, Li Cheuk-hin and Chan Sui-wing, said they were assaulted by the police in Mong Kok despite being mere pedestrians, Ming Pao Daily reported Wednesday, citing court documents.

Li, who claimed to be an university student, said in a writ that he was attacked by several policemen at the crossroads of Argyle Street and Tung Choi Street in the early hours of December 1.

One policeman grabbed him by the genitals and caused him excruciating pain, he said. Li also claimed that he lost his backpack which contained a purse, documents, a camera and some cash as the policemen threw it away when they tried to arrest him.

Meanwhile, Chan said in another writ that he was beaten up by six to seven policemen in the early hours of November 5 when he passed the area near the crossroads of Nathan Road and Argyle Street.

The officers pushed him against some wooden structures and also hit him on the nose with their knees, he complained.

Chan added that he was placed under illegal detention. While in detention, the police took away his mobile phone — which he is yet to recover — and also harassed and humiliated him, he said. When he sought to call a lawyer, his request was denied, Chan added.

Chan claimed that the police searched his residence twice without his consent and illegally accessed his banking records and passport. One police officer even asked him if his trip to Taiwan earlier last year was to support the island’s Sunflower student movement.

Asserting that they were tortured and that their human rights had been seriously infringed, Li and Chan said they had written to the police on January 19 to show their intention to take legal action.

The Department of Justice sent a reply saying that it was seeking instructions and asked the duo to hold off on any action. But later, the department never got back to them, they said.

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TL/MY/RC

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