22 October 2016
About 10 protesters rally in front of the building in Toronto where Leung Chun-ying is going to make a speech. Photo:
About 10 protesters rally in front of the building in Toronto where Leung Chun-ying is going to make a speech. Photo:

Pro-democracy protesters challenge Leung in Toronto

About 10 pro-democracy protesters demonstrated against Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying in Toronto before he attended a seminar Tuesday.

Holding the British Hong Kong colonial flag, yellow umbrellas and “true democracy” banners in the rain, the protesters urged Leung to safeguard the principles of “one country, two systems”, Hong Kong people ruling Hong Kong and a high degree of autonomy, RTHK reported.

Canada-Hong Kong Link, an organization working to foster community involvement among Hong Kong-Canadians, was among the organizers of the protest.

It urged Leung to address the housing and livelihood problems of the people of Hong Kong.

Protesters and members of Canada-Hong Kong Link were not allowed to enter the conference center where the “Think Asia, Think Hong Kong” seminar organized by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council took place. 

In a speech to the seminar participants, Leung said the Hong Kong government has put great effort into working on its political reform package in the last two years.

He urged pan-democrats to be rational in analyzing whether they should support or vote against the package.

Leung said he hopes the proposal can be passed in the Legislative Council.

If the package is rejected, there is no Plan B to restart political reform, Leung said.

The government will then focus on economic issues, he said. 

Meanwhile, Leung encouraged Canadian businessmen to invest in Hong Kong, which is the largest offshore renminbi market.

He said Hong Kong can provide high-quality services and connections to global enterprises that want to invest in projects related to China’s “one belt, one road” plan.

Leung will meet Kathleen Wynne, premier of the province of Ontario, and local leaders in politics, business and education. 

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Protesters display posters against Leung and the mainlandization of Hong Kong. Photo:

Protesters mock a comment by Leung in October expressing fear that Hongkongers earning less than HK$14,000 would dominate an open election process and drive government policy. Photo:

EJ Insight intern reporter

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