Date
24 March 2017
Simon Peh says the ICAC should continue to improve its ability to investigate corruption by using the latest technology. Photos: HKEJ, internet
Simon Peh says the ICAC should continue to improve its ability to investigate corruption by using the latest technology. Photos: HKEJ, internet

ICAC says it sought a demo of spy software

Hong Kong’s anti-corruption watchdog says it made inquiries about a commercial hacking software and asked for a demonstration from its manufacturer.

The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) confirmed it had e-mailed an Italian company about the Galileo software, according to Apple Daily which cited investigator Simon Peh.

Peh’s comment followed revelations by WikiLeaks that the ICAC approached the Italian company to show it how the hacking program works.

Galileo is a remote-control hacking suite that allows access to computers and devices on all platforms.

The program is marketed to government spy agencies.

The ICAC earlier refused to comment on whether it had acquired any spyware.

Peh said the agency should continue to improve its ability to investigate corruption with the use of the latest technology.

However, he said ICAC investigations and data collection should comply with the law.

Democratic Party lawmaker James To questioned the legality of the Galileo software, saying it is outside the scope of regulations on the interception of communications.

He said the spyware could be used as a political tool if law enforcement officers are allowed to use it in investigations or the government legalizes it.

Ryan Wong, director of the ICAC execution department, said the agency will not intrude on people’s privacy with any spyware.

WikiLeaks reveals ICAC’s interest in commercial hacking software

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