Date
29 May 2017
A voter has reported to police that his personal data on the electoral rolls was changed by someone who filed an unauthorized request for change of particulars. Photos: HKEJ
A voter has reported to police that his personal data on the electoral rolls was changed by someone who filed an unauthorized request for change of particulars. Photos: HKEJ

Voter reports to police his registered address was tampered with

A voter found that the address he registered with the Registration and Electoral Office (REO) had been changed by someone else, Ming Pao Daily reported Friday.

The discovery follows reports that the REO had allowed some voters to use a hotel as their residential address.

A voter surnamed Pan only became aware that his address — listed on the provisional registers of electors for the district council elections to be held in November — had been changed after a reporter from the newspaper confirmed it with him.

Pan’s registered address on the list is an office in Shun Tak Centre in Central and Western District, but in fact he lives in Pok Fu Lam and so should be listed as a voter in Southern District.

In addition to several errors, including an incorrect signature and the omission of the Chinese commercial code for his name on the application form, Pan said his English name should not have appeared, as he never includes it when filling out forms.

Pan has reported the forgery to the police.

A spokesman for the REO said it did receive an application to make changes to Pan’s registered data, but the case has been forwarded to law enforcement authorities now that Ming Pao has brought it to the attention of the office.

He said the REO has been very discreet in handling applications regarding the registration of personal data and related changes.

Pan has asked the REO to correct his registered address back to the one in Pok Fu Lam.

Lawyer Daniel Wong Kwok-tung said anyone who tampers with other voters’ registered data without authorization could face up to 14 years in jail for electoral fraud and forgery of documents.

Some legislators and political commentator Ivan Choy Chi-keung said the case exposed a loophole in the electoral system that should be dealt with seriously, as some candidates might use it to help them gain an advantage over their opponents in elections.

Voters can check their registered details using the Online Voter Information Enquiry System:

[Check here]

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/AC/FL

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