Date
25 March 2017
(Left) A mainland netizen says Taiwanese are shameful and unwise for pursuing independence. (Right) A Taiwanese says mainland netizens are welcome to leave messages on Facebook and enjoy freedom of speech. Photos: Facebook
(Left) A mainland netizen says Taiwanese are shameful and unwise for pursuing independence. (Right) A Taiwanese says mainland netizens are welcome to leave messages on Facebook and enjoy freedom of speech. Photos: Facebook

How not to wage anti-Taiwan social media war

A motley group of mainland netizens waged a social media war against their Taiwanese counterparts to denounce the poll victory of Taiwan’s President-elect Tsai Ing-wen, but got lost in “enemy territory” and were finally defeated by their own state censors.

On Wednesday night, mainland social media users pledged to bypass the Great Firewall of China to bombard the Facebook accounts of Taiwanese celebrities and media outfits with anti-Taiwan messages, Stand News reported.

The mainlanders decided on the move after Tsai, the head of the Democratic Progressive Party, was elected president in the island’s general elections last Saturday.

Tsai’s victory has angered many mainland netizens, who accused her of seeking Taiwan’s independence.

However, their “invasion” encountered difficulties, mainly because they failed to locate or access their target websites — to the amusement of their “enemies”. 

Some Taiwan netizens, who noticed that mainlanders were posting messages on the wrong social forums, advised them to use traditional Chinese characters instead of simplified Chinese text to reach the social forums of Taiwanese news websites.

In one case, mainlanders got stuck in the entertainment section of television news channel SET News, so one Taiwanese attached a link to the news section so they could find the “right battlefield”.

Tsai’s Facebook page was flooded with tens of thousands of messages apparently from Chinese internet users in just a matter of hours on Wednesday.

The posts were mostly messages opposing Taiwan’s independence, as well as irrelevant and nonsense remarks meant to clutter the account.

A DPP spokesman said the party does not plan to delete them, saying all netizens are welcome to visit “free, democratic Taiwan”.

Eventually, mainland web administrators took down a live broadcast of the netizens’ online attacks.

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TL/DY/CG

Mainland and Taiwanese netizens have an online battle after Apple Daily posted a story on Facebook with a picture of pop singer Chou Tzu-yu holding a Taiwanese flag. Photo: Facebook


A mainland netizen says Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan belong to China. Another says he wants to punch a Taiwanese separatist. Photos: Facebook


A Taiwanese netizen uses a picture of Xi Jinping to tell mainland netizens who have bypassed the Great Firewall of China to go home. Photo: Facebook


A mainland netizen says China will erect as many communist flags as possible in Taiwan. Photo: Facebook


A Taiwanese netizen says he doesn’t want to talk to mainland counterparts, who have a lower level of knowledge. Photo: Facebook


(Right) A mainland netizen says Taiwanese separatists are stupid. (Left) A Taiwanese netizen says the mainland counterparts lack photos to fight back. Photos: Facebook


A post says "I’m a Taiwanese, not Chinese". Photo: Facebook


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