Date
23 July 2017
Part of the stash of HK$1,000 bills is shown after it was dug up in Ma On Shan. The money was part of a HK$28 million ransom in the 2015 kidnapping of Bossini heiress Rosita Law (inset). Photos: HK Police, CNSA
Part of the stash of HK$1,000 bills is shown after it was dug up in Ma On Shan. The money was part of a HK$28 million ransom in the 2015 kidnapping of Bossini heiress Rosita Law (inset). Photos: HK Police, CNSA

Last of HK$28 mln ransom found in Bossini kidnapping

All but chump change has been recovered from a HK$28 million (US$3.6 million) ransom for a Hong Kong fashion retail heiress who was kidnapped last year and later released unharmed.

Police dug up HK$6.35 million buried in a grassland in Ma On Shan, the last tranche of ransom money paid by the family of Bossini heiress Rosita Law to her kidnappers, Apple Daily reports.

About HK$110,000 is still missing which authorities said might have been used by the suspects when they fled to the mainland.

Thursday’s find was all stacks of HK$1,000 bills in rice bags and a nylon container buried one meter underground, Kowloon East regional crime unit chief Chung Chi-ming said.

Hong Kong police got help from their mainland counterparts who supplied the lead.

Chung said the search was tricky because the area has no road signs and is nowhere near a hiking trail.

Also, the search area was too vast — about a fourth of Hong Kong’s land mass.

Chinese police used composite photos and video recordings of the Hong Kong countryside supplied by local authorities to help them in interrogating the suspects.

Law was kidnapped from her Sai Kung home on April 25, 2015 and taken to a mountain cave.

She was released unharmed after her father paid a HK$28 million ransom.

Nine suspects were subsequently arrested in the mainland.

One was captured in Hong Kong and will stand trial in the High Court in February next year.

Barrister Albert Luk said the money can be returned to Law once the legal proceedings are completed.

Also, any part of the money recovered in the mainland can be repatriated to Hong Kong under international law and handed back to its owner, he said.

– Contact us at english@hkej.com

EL/AC/RA

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