Date
25 March 2017
Singapore’s ‘black-and-white houses’ are much sought after by people longing for an old-world lifestyle. Photo: WSJ
Singapore’s ‘black-and-white houses’ are much sought after by people longing for an old-world lifestyle. Photo: WSJ

Stately Tudor homes become prized properties in Singapore

Stately Tudor homes resting on wide swaths of green and preserving a piece of the city’s colonial days have emerged as prized properties in Singapore, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The houses, called black-and-whites because of their whitewashed exteriors and black-stained timber details, are especially favored by wealthy expatriates.

Distinctive Eastern influences have been added to the design to conform to life in the tropics: broad verandas, wide eaves and tall shutters to keep out the sun’s glare, the report noted.

“They are the perfect answer for people looking for a bit of greenery and some space,” Diana hua, a Singapore guide, was quoted as saying.

“They offer a different lifestyle.”

The houses, which can be found in central areas such as Nassim Road and the upscale Goodwood Hill and coastal settlements in Seletar and Sembawang, vary in size.

More exclusive villas range from about 8,500 to 11,000 square feet, while townhouses and one-story homes in the same style start at about 2,000 square feet.

“There aren’t many black-and-white-houses available for sale that are freehold,” a property owner was quoted as saying.

Many old properties have been torn down to accommodate development. Some that remain have been converted into offices, restaurants and galleries.

Built primarily by the British from the late 19th century until World War II, the black-and-whites once housed high-ranking officials, military men and the society’s elites.

– Contact us at [email protected]

RA/RC

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe