Date
18 October 2017
There were many visitors to the Tung Wah Charity Carnival at the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal during the Easter holiday. Photos: HKEJ, Xinhua
There were many visitors to the Tung Wah Charity Carnival at the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal during the Easter holiday. Photos: HKEJ, Xinhua

Bring some cheer to unhappy Hongkongers

I stayed in Hong Kong this Easter holiday, and I took my family to the Tung Wah Charity Carnival for some fun.

However, the long queues made the day truly exhausting.

I had a chat with carnival staff during the long wait. They told me it wasn’t as crowded a few weeks ago, especially during the days when the event overlapped with the carnival in Central. 

It even had to offer discounts to attract customers. But after the Central offering ended, people rushed to the charity carnival and the staff could barely rest.

Indeed, Hong Kong lacks entertainment facilities. Although we have two theme parks, people get bored after visiting them several times a year.

Parks or beaches? It would be hard to set foot in one if the weather is fine. Ball games? Booking a court is hard.

How about just staying at home? Flat too small and crowded.

No wonder in a global survey of happiness, Hong Kong ranks only 75th among all countries and regions — just a bit higher than Somalia on the list.

After spending the day at the Carnival, we walked to get our car parked at the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal.

Although a cruise was anchored at the terminal, the HK$7 billion project, designed by renowned architect Forster + Partners, was cheerless.

It’s less than three years since the terminal opened, but many spots are dirty, dilapidated and dim.

The parking service is also unsatisfactory. Such a white elephant of a project is truly lamentable.

Would more big infrastructure projects such as this make Hongkongers feel better? We should think about it.

If you are a leader, whether of a big company or a small city, one of your key tasks is to keep people happy and entertained.

If you couldn’t keep them thrilled or entertained, at least make sure they are contented.

If everyone’s unhappy, how can we have a harmonious society?

If the government can save a small part of the money allotted for white elephants to entertain the public, it may be a good start.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on April 5.

Translation by Myssie You

[Chinese version 中文版]

– Contact us at [email protected]

MY/DY/CG

Member of HKUST’s MBA Alumni Association

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe