Date
17 October 2017
Fishermen in Zhuhai expend little effort in catching their prey, by using large square nets to trap the fish. Photo: HKEJ
Fishermen in Zhuhai expend little effort in catching their prey, by using large square nets to trap the fish. Photo: HKEJ

The wisdom of the fisherfolk

On the ferry heading to Jiuzhou port in Zhuhai, I caught sight of some interesting fishing nets.

I was told they were tsang pang (罾棚), large square nets that can easily be lowered and raised from the bank of the river to catch fish.

No bait but immense patience is needed.

Luck is also important.

The catch for the day could range from nothing to a few dozens of catties of fish that had fallen into the trap.

Flathead grey mullet (烏頭), wahoo (膠魚) and Japanese seabass (海鱸) are common catches.

The local fishermen have built a temporary kitchen next to the square nets so that they can immediately cook what they have caught.

For instance, they slice fresh Japanese seabass into pieces for sashimi, and the bones go with turnips in a stew.

The day I visited, the nets did not yield anything.

My friends and I went to a Shunde restaurant for a congee hotpot with a range of raw ingredients.

We also ordered a pot of steamed bighead carp with assorted seafood.

The best thing about such meals together is that we can finish everything, including the hotpot soup base, with a final bowl of congee each.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on May 20.

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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