Date
25 September 2017
Angela Leong acquired the property in 1997 for HK$180 million; it is now estimated to be worth more than HK$500 million. Photos: Google Maps, Bloomberg
Angela Leong acquired the property in 1997 for HK$180 million; it is now estimated to be worth more than HK$500 million. Photos: Google Maps, Bloomberg

Repulse Bay Road mansion owned by Stanley Ho wife burglarized

Police have launched an investigation into a burglary at a luxury mansion on Repulse Bay Road belonging to Angela Leong On-kei, executive director of Macau gaming operator SJM Holdings (00880.HK) and the fourth wife of Macau casino mogul Stanley Ho Hung-sun.

The burglary was reported to the police by a domestic helper who works at the mansion, who said she noticed at around 10 a.m. on Saturday that a window of the residence had been pried open, apparently by burglars, Apple Daily reports.

Searches conducted by the police in the neighborhood failed to find any suspects.

Since the 12,000 square foot property has been under renovation and Leong and family members have moved to another house, only a few valuables are believed to have been left there.

Leong acquired the property in 1997 for HK$180 million (US$23.2 million); it is now estimated to be worth more than HK$500 million.

Exactly what were taken away and how much they were worth still needed to be confirmed, Leong, who was on a business trip in Australia at the time of the incident, told Apple Daily.

Leong’s property is one of the three mansions on Repulse Bay Road, where some of Hong Kong’s wealthy people and celebrities live, that have been broken into over the past 20 days.

Some decorative gold items were stolen from a mansion owned by Cheng Yu-tung, the billionaire founder of New World Development Group, on Aug. 8.

Earlier that day, another house less than two kilometers away from the Cheng mansion also fell victim to burglars, but the foreigner staying there was able to subdue the suspect.

Roger Ching, a senior consultant for mansion security, said three security loopholes are common in luxury mansions in Hong Kong that make them easy targets of burglars, news website hk01.com reported.

First, many of them are built along hills where security measures are wanting.

Second, barbed wires set up around the premises are not strong enough.

And third, the lighting systems are not sufficient.

Ching suggested that security personnel should conduct inspections of such properties twice a day, in daytime and nighttime, while installation of anti-theft systems is imperative.

Police look into burglary at tycoon Cheng Yu-tung’s mansion (Aug. 9, 2016)

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TL/AC/CG

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