24 October 2016
Beau Jessup has now earned nearly 50,000 pounds (US$66,000) from her website Special Name. Photo: BBC
Beau Jessup has now earned nearly 50,000 pounds (US$66,000) from her website Special Name. Photo: BBC

Teen rakes in thousands giving Chinese babies English names

Sweet 16, almost a lady but not quite.

Most schoolgirls that age would probably spend most of their free time chatting about the coolest boy band and the latest campus crush.

Not Beau Jessup, from Gloucestershire in South West England.

Six months ago, she started a website that advises Chinese parents on English names for their babies.

From her website called Special Name she’s now earned nearly 50,000 pounds (US$66,000), The Huffington Post reports.

Jessup came up with the idea after visiting China, where she had been asked by a woman to give an English name to her newborn.

“They explained an English name is vital because you can’t use a Chinese name on an email or a university application to the UK,” Jessup told the Evening Standard. “Your English name stays with you for life.”

Back in England, she decided to continue helping Chinese parents with babies’ names and earn a few bucks for the effort.

She asked her dad, who is a businessman, for a 1,500 loan, and started her online business.

On Special Name, Jessup doesn’t simply suggest a name for a baby.

The parents must choose for themselves what they think is the best name for their newborn.

They are first asked for the baby’s gender and then given a list of 12 personality traits, from which they must choose five that they want their child’s name to reflect.

The website then suggests three names that correspond with those traits.

It explains the meanings of the three names, and mentions the names of famous persons who bear those names.

Once the parents have made a choice, the website comes up with a downloadable certificate with the child’s name and meaning.

The entire process takes less than five minutes, and the fee is 60 pence.

Since launching her website, Jessup says she has helped more than 200,000 parents find English names for their babies.

“It’s nice to be a part of such a happy experience and be a part of those young stages in a baby’s life,” she told BBC Newsbeat.

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