Date
20 October 2017
The umeshu corner in Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market offers a tasting menu of any five out of 10 choices of plum wine. Photo: HKEJ
The umeshu corner in Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market offers a tasting menu of any five out of 10 choices of plum wine. Photo: HKEJ

Hong Kong has its own Japanese fish market

On a recent visit to the Tsukiji Fish Market, I prepared myself for the breathtaking tuna cutting show.

However, I was quickly distracted by the sight of lobster rolls when I walked past a specialty shop around the corner.

Maybe it was a good idea to grab a roll, I wondered, before taking fresh slices of fatty tuna sashimi.

Lobster rolls are such a great hit in Japan.

Last year, I spent about 30 minutes in a light shower waiting for a lobster roll in Harajuku.

I was glad I had made a good call.

Half-a-roll-option was very gratifying while my stomach could still have plenty of room for tuna.

Don’t be mistaken. I was not in Tokyo this time. The scene I just described was in Tsukiji Yamataka Seafood Market in Hong Kong.

Situated in Wan Chai Pier, the Hong Kong version of the world-famous Japanese fish market is no less exciting than those in Tokyo, Wakayama or Sapporo.

It amazes visitors with a magnificent view of Victoria Harbor, plus the Christmas decorative lights and other festive trimmings.

The fresh tuna cutting show is always a highlight of any visit.

I can still remember how the enormous tuna is dissected by a master into various delicious cuts.

Everyone would chase after the otoro cut at the Kuroshio market in Wakayama some years back. Every bite was satisfying.

The 11,000-square-foot Hong Kong seafood market puts on a show every day, offering not only seafood from Japan but also oysters, mussels, crabs, lobsters and many shellfish from all around the world.

Some sashimi platters are quite reasonably priced like those offered in Japanese supermarkets.

Another highlight of the fish market is the umeshu corner, which is decorated with a row of large vintage plum wine jars.

It offers a tasting menu where customers can try five out of 10 flavors. The bartender guides you through the choices – from the lightest ones to the strongest.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Dec. 7

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version 中文版]

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DY/JP/RA

a veteran journalist and food critic

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