Date
27 July 2017
John Tsang seeks drastic changes to the curriculum, but agrees that Chinese History should be a compulsory subject. Carrie Lam (inset) wants a debate with her rivals on the issue of public finances. Photos: Facebook/John Tsang, HKEJ
John Tsang seeks drastic changes to the curriculum, but agrees that Chinese History should be a compulsory subject. Carrie Lam (inset) wants a debate with her rivals on the issue of public finances. Photos: Facebook/John Tsang, HKEJ

Tsang to highlight education reform, elderly care in manifesto

Chief executive aspirant John Tsang is set to unveil his political platform on Monday with education and elderly care expected to be high on the agenda, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

Tsang’s manifesto, a document over 50 pages long, would also touch on Hong Kong’s political reform and governance, sources told the newspaper.

The former financial secretary is said to be advocating for the return of the post of director of education, to be assumed by an industry professional, while demanding that private developers allocate space for non-governmental organizations for the construction of elderly care centers.

Tsang is expected to publish his platform on his campaign website in the morning and explain his policies in a press conference in the afternoon.

In the manifesto, Tsang is in favor of crafting legislation to implement Article 23 of the Basic Law on security matters, while pressing for reforms on the government structure.

He seeks to reinstate the position of director of education to implement education policies, instead of the current setup where a permanent secretary heads the education bureau.

He will propose drastic changes to the curriculum, but agrees that Chinese History should be a compulsory subject.

Tsang will also propose incentives for startups, such as in the matter of renting office space.

Meanwhile, a crowdfunding exercise launched by Tsang on Friday has solicited HK$3.96 million from over 19,000 donors as of 12:30 a.m. on Monday.

Meanwhile, former chief secretary Carrie Lam, who is also running for Hong Kong’s top job, said while populism is an inevitable element in an election, she hopes the chief executive election would not become a battle of making promises among candidates.

Lam said she looks forward to debating on the subject of public finances with other candidates face to face.

On Sunday, over 100 people took to the streets to oppose Lam’s bid to become Hong Kong’s next chief executive.

The protesters, joined by legislator Claudia Mo, marched from Causeway Bay to Lam’s campaign office in Wan Chai.

[Chinese version 中文版]

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Hong Kong Economic Journal

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